Nobles Grille to Deliver 400 Thanksgiving Meals on November 25th

More than 17% of Forsyth County residents, or over 60,000 individuals, are food-insecure. Hunger adversely affects productivity, health and the academic performance of children. Thanks to Nobles Grille of Winston-Salem, 400 local men, women and children will enjoy a delicious Thanksgiving meal for free. The meals will be distributed to six local non-profit agencies, all of which are United Way-supported programs, on Wednesday, November 25.

We invite local media to cover one of these locations, and recommend The Salvation Army given the large number of meals and the fact that they will be served on site.  At some other locations, the meals will be boxed and distributed for consumption off-site.  Agency contact information for all locations is attached.

Experiment in Self-Reliance, 1439 East Fifth Street (40 meals)
Family Services, 1868 Kentucky Avenue (40 meals)
The Fellowship Home, 661 North Spring Street (20 meals)
Forsyth Rapid Rehousing Collaborative, 301 North Main Street, Suite 1700 (140 meals)
The Salvation Army – Center of Hope, 1255 North Trade Street (140 meals)
YWCA Hawley House, 941 West Street (20 meals)

United Way of Forsyth County is grateful for partners like Nobles Grille that help us meet the needs of those in crisis, especially during the holiday season.

* Source: Feeding America, Map the Meal Gap 2015.

CONTACTS

Nobles Grille
Nick Allen – (336)777-8477
Manager/Banquet Coordinator
nick@noblesrestaurants.com

Participating Agencies

Experiment in Self-Reliance
1439 East Fifth Street
Johnnie Johnson – 336.722.9400 ext. 155
Johnnie.johnson@eisr.org

Family Services
1868 Kentucky Avenue
Brittany Holmes – 336.724.3979
bholmes@fsifamily.org

Fellowship Home
661 N. Spring Street
Ken Bower – 336.727.1084
kbower@thefellowshiphome.org

Forsyth Rapid Rehousing Collaborative
301 North Main Street, Suite 1700
Kristle Coble – 336.788.4965 (ext. 208)
ristle.coble@uwforsyth.org

The Salvation Army
1255 N. Trade Street
Sonia Williams – 336.722.9597
Sonia.william@uss.salvationarmy.org

YWCA Hawley House
941 West Street
Kristin O’Leary – 336.721.0733
kristino@ywcaws.org

NOBLES GRILLE TO DELIVER 400 THANKSGIVING MEALS ON NOVEMBER 25

PRESS RELEASE​
For immediate release​

CONTACT: Tory Gillett
336-721-9319 (office)
​Tory Gillett@uwforsyth.org

NOBLES GRILLE TO DELIVER 400 THANKSGIVING MEALS ON NOVEMBER 25

Winston-Salem, NC ….. More than 17% of Forsyth County residents, or over 60,000 individuals, are food-insecure. Hunger adversely affects productivity, health and the academic performance of children.

Thanks to Nobles Grille of Winston-Salem, 400 local men, women and children will enjoy a delicious Thanksgiving meal for free. The meals will be distributed to six local non-profit agencies, all of which are United Way-supported programs, on Wednesday, November 25:

• Experiment in Self-Reliance, 1439 East Fifth Street (40 meals)
• Family Services, 1868 Kentucky Avenue (40 meals)
• The Fellowship Home, 661 North Spring Street (20 meals)
• Forsyth Rapid Rehousing Collaborative, 301 North Main Street, Suite 1700 (140 meals)
• The Salvation Army – Center of Hope, 1255 North Trade Street (140 meals)
• YWCA Hawley House, 941 West Street (20 meals)

United Way of Forsyth County is grateful for partners like Nobles Grille that help us meet the needs of those in crisis, especially during the holiday season.

We invite local media to cover one of these locations, and recommend The Salvation Army given the large number of meals and the fact that they will be served on site. At some other locations, the meals will be boxed and distributed for consumption off-site. Agency contact information for all locations is attached.

* Source: Feeding America, Map the Meal Gap 2015.

# # #

United Way of Forsyth County believes quality of life relies on three building blocks—education, financial stability, and health. All three are interdependent and critical to the collective success of our community. United Way of Forsyth County strengthens the community by aligning resources and strategic partners to achieve measurable, lasting results. The organization invests in improving student success and the high school graduation rate, increasing financial stability among lower-income individuals and families, broadening access to health care and prescription medications to the un- and under-insured, and providing critical assistance to those facing immediate crisis. Learn more about our work at ForsythUnitedWay.org.

 

CONTACTS

Nobles Grille

Nick Allen
Restaurant Manager/Banquet Coordinator
(336)777-8477
nick@noblesrestaurants.com​

Participating Agencies

Experiment in Self-Reliance
1439 East Fifth Street
Johnnie Johnson – 336.722.9400 ext. 155
Johnnie.johnson@eisr.org​

Family Services
1868 Kentucky Avenue
Brittany Holmes – 336.724.3979
bholmes@fsifamily.org​

Fellowship Home
661 N. Spring Street
Ken Bower – 336.727.1084
kbower@thefellowshiphome.org​

Forsyth Rapid Rehousing Collaborative
301 North Main Street, Suite 1700
Kristle Coble – 336.788.4965 (ext. 208)
kristle.coble@uwforsyth.org​

The Salvation Army
1255 N. Trade Street
Sonia Williams – 336.722.9597
Sonia.william@uss.salvationarmy.org​

YWCA Hawley House
941 West Street
Kristin O’Leary – 336.721.0733
kristino@ywcaws.org​

Meet Julee!

I remember seeing the ad last summer for the Campaign Associate Program. United Way of Forsyth County was looking for applicants who were enthusiastic (no problem with that!), organized (oh, yes, I am a champion list maker), and good at presenting to groups of all sizes (I admit I am a talker!). What really caught my eye was the language around “making a difference in your community”. That did it. I was hooked. I knew then that I wanted to join United Way as a Campaign Associate.

Five of us started on August 24. We were all different…just like our community. Men and women, from 20 something to mid 60s, with all sorts of varied backgrounds…banking, healthcare, merchandising and military.

 

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From day one our goal was to help United Way of Forsyth County have a successful 2015 Campaign! We focused on the companies that were assigned to us. We spread out over the county meeting our Champions (the liaisons at those companies), arranging employee meetings, delivering campaign materials. Then the campaign kicked off and our days were filled with picking up Krispy Kreme donuts, holding employee meetings to talk about United Way, and getting to know the wonderful people at our companies. At each meeting, we shared information about our community’s issues and what is being done by United Way and others to solve them. And we always let our companies and their employees know the impact their dollars make in our community.

Besides working to make a difference in our community and making new friends, the Campaign Associate Program has allowed us to visit companies in Winston Salem/Forsyth County that we would not have had an opportunity to get to know otherwise. What a delight it has been to meet other citizens of Forsyth County that want to Live United!

IMG_0157Along the way, our group became a team. We shared one office, so every day (at some point) our paths would cross and we would share our stories, offer support when needed, learn from each other and pitch in to help each other in any way we could. We also had fun…bowling with the Campaign Cabinet Chairs, using the photo booth at our companies, helping at Moonlight Madness, taking part in a Day of Caring at the Second Harvest Food Bank, and celebrating Halloween with all of the United Way staff.

As our twelve weeks as Campaign Associates come to an end, we look back at a great experience, new friends, a better understanding of Living United, and the hope that we have made a difference in this place we call home.

-Julee Rose, 2015 Campaign Associate

An End to Veteran Homelessness

According to the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness, Winston-Salem and Forsyth County have met the challenge of housing their homeless veterans. In a letter to Mayor Allen Joines, Executive Director Matthew Doherty confirmed that the city and county have met the council’s measure for having ended veteran homelessness by putting in place resources to rapidly find permanent housing for anyone identified as a homeless veteran.

In 2014, Joines signed on to participate in the Mayor’s Challenge to End Veteran Homelessness, announced by the Obama Administration. Joines that year also signed up Winston-Salem as one of sixteen founding members of the Veterans Housing Leadership Network, an initiative organized by the National League of Cities challenging cities to end veteran homelessness by 2015.

Winston-Salem has been working to reduce homelessness through the efforts of the Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Commission on Ending Homelessness, an advisory board appointed by the City Council and the Forsyth County Commissioners to implement the recommendations of the Ten-Year Plan to End Chronic Homelessness. The plan was adopted in 2006. United Way of Forsyth County provides staff support for the commission and oversees its day-to-day activities.

For veterans, the commission compiled grants and donations to build a housing facility with 24 beds for homeless veterans that provide supportive services and help them transition to permanent housing. The commission also helped the Department of Veterans Affairs and the Housing Authority of Winston-Salem secure 139 housing vouchers for homeless veterans in Forsyth County, and coordinated the efforts of local non-profit agencies that are working to house the homeless.

“Our campaign to end veteran homelessness has been a team effort,” says Andrea Kurtz, the senior director of housing strategies for the United Way and the director for the Commission on Ending Homelessness. “Credit belongs to the agencies who have been making this happen, including the Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Helping Veterans Heal, the Salvation Army, United Way, Housing and Urban Development, Good Will Industries of Northwest North Carolina, the N.C. Housing Foundation, Experiment in Self-Reliance, the city’s Community and Business Development Department, the Housing Authority of Winston-Salem, H.A.R.R.Y. Veteran Community Outreach Services and Whole Man Ministries.”

On this Veteran’s Day, we’d like to say thank you to all who have served our country—and all who serve our veterans!

Making an Impact

On October 21, 2015, I climbed into a bus at the United Metropolitan Missionary Baptist Church, with the hope of learning a little bit about how the United Way of Forsyth County is partnering with local schools. The bus set out and traveled its route to East Forsyth Middle School, and I began to realize that I had been thinking about “education impact” too narrowly, and I had previously failed to consider how our community, its challenges, and its solutions, are all deeply intertwined with our educational system.

As we traveled, we were encouraged to observe our surroundings; we drove past shops, local residents, restaurants, homes, and natural spaces, all of which are existing assets that have the ability to enhance and strengthen the communities in which they are found. Perhaps it was this particular stretch of road, but I was astounded by the number of schools along the way – we passed Atkins High School, Petree Elementary School, and East Forsyth High School. These special community assets, our schools, all point to the strength and potential that exist within our neighborhoods. These places of learning offer educational experiences that can open up opportunities for students, their families, and other community members.

Upon arriving at East Forsyth Middle School, we were warmly welcomed by Principal Poteat and several faculty and staff, all of whom conveyed a unified vision for educational success and a passion for addressing the holistic needs of students. I learned that the school, in partnership with the United Way of Forsyth County’s Women’s Leadership Council, has implemented programs to assist students with navigating their middle school years from start to finish. These initiatives also seek to equip students with the skills and tools needed for continued achievement throughout high school, college, and career endeavors. The school offers the Summer Success Academy for rising sixth graders, provides after-school tutoring for all students, and utilizes a family engagement coordinator to provide targeted care and advocacy for students. I am thankful for the engagement and investment of these teachers and staff in our community; they are building foundational relationships and working tirelessly to tear down potential barriers to student success. Principal Poteat mentioned that he is always overjoyed to hear about his students’ successes after they’ve moved on to high school and beyond, and without a doubt, we should all share in that excitement as community members who benefit from the advancement and enrichment of our fellow Forsyth County residents.

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In the space of a Wednesday lunch break, on a brief bus ride and in a middle school library, I was inspired, challenged, and encouraged – that we are all part of this community, and we therefore all have a stake in the educational outcomes of students. Without a doubt, the Education Impact Tour had an impact on me. It shed light on some of the challenges we face in Forsyth County, but more importantly, it illuminated the great possibility that lies in uniting our common resources to promote growth and overcome those challenges.

Written by Nadia D. Clevenger, CPA
Tax Senior Associate
Dixon Hughes Goodman LLP