PRESS RELEASE: United Way Forsyth County CEO and President Cindy Gordineer Attends United Way Leaders College Promise Meeting at the White House

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United Way Forsyth County CEO and President Cindy Gordineer Attends United Way Leaders College Promise Meeting at the White House

In the 2015 State of the Union, the President called on the country to make two years of community college free for responsible students across the country.

On September 12, 2016, United Way of Forsyth County President and CEO, Cindy Gordineer attended a meeting at the White House with Senior Administration Officials, fellow United Way CEO’s and United Way Worldwide CEO Brian Gallagher for a high level discussion of the mutual goals and how this work might advance in North Carolina and Forsyth County.

The America’s College Promise proposal would create a new partnership with states to help them waive tuition in high-quality programs for responsible students, while promoting key reforms to help more students complete at least two years of college. Restructuring the community college experience, coupled with free tuition, can lead to gains in student enrollment, persistence, and completion transfer, and employment.

Gordineer notes, “It was an honor to be invited to be a part of this important conversation. It is a crucial extension of our ongoing work and efforts to increase educational attainment in Forsyth County. We know that by 2020 an estimated 65 percent of available jobs will require at least some college or an associate’s degree.  We will continue our efforts to impact positive change in our educational system and propel our community forward.”

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United Way of Forsyth County believes quality of life relies on education, financial stability, health, and basic needs. All four are critical and interdependent to the collective success of our community. United Way of Forsyth County creates positive change in the community by aligning resources and strategic partners to achieve measurable, lasting results. We invest in improving student success and the high school graduation rate, increasing financial stability among lower-income individuals and families, broadening access to health care and prescription medications to the un- and under-insured, and providing critical assistance to those facing immediate crisis. Learn more about our work and rediscover the why behind the way at www.forsythunitedway.org. 

PRESS RELEASE: United Way of Forsyth County Kicks Off 2016 Campaign

Picture 1United Way of Forsyth County kicked off its 2016 Annual Campaign at the 5th Annual Moonlight Madness Run August 26, 2016 at Bailey Park. This was the first year that the United Way sponsored Moonlight Madness which had previously been organized by the city of Winston-Salem.

The Kickoff event is the start of United Way’s annual fundraising effort and United Way team members, partner agencies and volunteers were joined by more than 590 participants in the Fun Run and 5K race. Sponsors included Windsor Jewelers, Foothills Brewing, Mellow Mushroom, The City of Winston-Salem, RAI and The Millennium Center.

“It’s wonderful how the community supports the United Way mission of building stronger lives for everyone in Forsyth County,” says John Fox, Chairman, First Tennessee Bank Mid-Atlantic Region and the 2016 Community Campaign Chair. “We are so fortunate to live in a community where more than 30,000 donors take part in the campaign each year. People in Forsyth County understand the value of investing in education, financial stability, healthier lives and basic needs of our neighbors.  They recognize that when they give through United Way, we can solve problems that none of us can solve alone.”

The theme of this year’s community campaign is “The Why Behind the Way.” The goals of United Way of Forsyth County reach beyond raising money, but also include educating community members about major issues and encouraging involvement.

“Although we’re proud of our successes, such as investing to help increase high school graduation rates from 71% in 2008 to 85.7% in 2016, many individuals and families in our community continue to struggle on a daily basis.  One in three children and one in four adults live in poverty and that impacts every aspect of their lives,” says Fox. “United Way collaborates and invests with partners to tackle the tough challenges and make a real impact.”

United Way’s annual campaign is a vital part of the organization’s work because the funds raised go to support local programs in the community. Last year, United Way Forsyth County funded forty-four local agencies with $10.8 million in funding focusing on the fundamentals of a good life: health, education, and financial stability.

United Way of Forsyth County believes quality of life relies on education, financial stability, health, and basic needs. All four are critical and interdependent to the collective success of our community. United Way of Forsyth County creates positive change in the community by aligning resources and strategic partners to achieve measurable, lasting results. We invest in improving student success and the high school graduation rate, increasing financial stability among lower-income individuals and families, broadening access to health care and prescription medications to the un- and under-insured, and providing critical assistance to those facing immediate crisis. Learn more about our work and rediscover the why behind the way at www.forsythunitedway.org. 

United Way Honors Volunteer Leaders

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT:

Tory Gillett
336-721-9321 (office) / 336-682-7468 (cell)
tory.gillett@uwforsyth.org

UNITED WAY OF FORSYTH COUNTY HONORS VOLUNTEER LEADERS

Winston-Salem, NC …..
United Way of Forsyth County honored two volunteer leaders last night at the annual Tocqueville and Legacy Society Recognition Dinner at the Old Salem Visitor Center. Henry A. (“Andy”) Brown was awarded the Paul Fulton Tocqueville Leadership Society Award for his ongoing commitment and service to the community through his support of United Way of Forsyth County. Ann Fritchman-Merkel was awarded the Tocqueville Council Volunteer of the Year Award in recognition and appreciation of outstanding volunteer service during the 2015 United Way Annual Campaign.

The Tocqueville Leadership Society consists of donors pledging more than $10,000 to United Way of Forsyth County in a given year. Paul Fulton, Jr. established a local chapter of the Alexis de Tocqueville Society in 1987. That first year, 22 members gave in that capacity. United Way of Forsyth County began its Leadership Circle in 1986. It was chaired by Dr. Thomas K. Hearn, Jr., President of Wake Forest University. In its first year, Leadership Circle had 400 members who gave $550,000. Ann C. Ring was the first recipient of the Alexis de Tocqueville Award. Later the award name changed to Paul Fulton Tocqueville Leadership Society Award. Currently, United Way of Forsyth County has the largest Tocqueville Leadership Society in North Carolina.

Andy Brown is Owner of Twin City Warehouses and COR365 Information Solutions. He serves on the Board of Leadership Winston-Salem. Andy’s service and commitment to United Way are reflected in both his involvement as a volunteer leader and his financial contributions. He served as a United Way Board member in 2005-2015, Board Chair in 2012-2013, and inaugural Chair of the “Place Matters” Committee, which oversaw the implementation of United Way’s place-based initiative, in 2014-2015. Under Andy’s leadership as Board Chair, United Way developed and began to implement its most recent strategic plan, expanding its goal to achieving sustainable community change. His commitment and belief that United Way is best positioned to make a positive difference is unwavering.

Andy first became a member of the Tocqueville Leadership Society in 2000 and a member of the Cornerstone Society in 2007. In 2013, he made United Way’s first major multi-year gift to accelerate outcomes in education. In 2007, Andy funded a step-up match program to encourage new Tocqueville donors. The match allows new Tocqueville donors to make an initial gift of $5,000, which is matched, so they are able to become part of the Tocqueville Leadership Society right away. The donor pledges to “step up” to $7,500 in the second year and the full $10,000 in their third year. This allows donors to implement a more significant financial commitment to United Way over a period of time. The match is credited with allowing our United Way to remain steady in Tocqueville giving through the Recession years of 2008 -2012 and see growth of Tocqueville membership since 2012 from 217 to 269 households, an increase of almost 25%.

Ann Fritchman-Merkel is the Chief Customer Officer for Hanesbrands Intimate Apparel business. She joined the company in 1992 and has served as Regional Sales Manager, Bali Marketing Manager, Department Store Vice President and Service Group Director for Sara Lee Intimate Apparel. Ann was promoted to Vice President of Customer Management in 2003, Chief Customer Officer/Target in 2008, and her current position in 2015. She serves on the Board of Directors for Winston-Salem Symphony and Sci Works . She has been actively involved with the HbI United Way campaign serving as Co-Chair, Chair, and Tocqueville Leadership Society starting in 2011. In 2015, she served as the Chair of the Tocqueville Leadership Society Campaign and the Volunteer of the Year Award recognizes her contributions in this critical role.

Cindy Gordineer, President and CEO of United Way of Forsyth County says, “The success of United Way is contingent upon the support and engagement of individuals like Andy and Ann, who generously give of their time and talents. Their commitment and engagement are invaluable and we thank them wholeheartedly for their past and future contributions to our community.”

UWFC Announces $2.8 Million in “Place Matters” Investments

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Tory Gillett
336-721-9321 (office) / 336-682-7468 (cell)
tory.gillett@uwforsyth.org

UNITED WAY OF FORSYTH COUNTY ANNOUNCES $2.8 MILLION IN “PLACE MATTERS” INVESTMENTS
United Way of Forsyth County has awarded an incremental $2,800,000 to social service organizations in Forsyth County as part of the 2016-2017 investment cycle. This amount is in addition to the $8,821,257 awarded in December of 2015. While the first wave of funding was invested in community-wide initiatives, the second wave is dedicated to the Place Matters pilot . Although funding decisions were handled in two waves this year, the total amount being invested in the community through United Way is consistent with last year.

Through United Way’s partnership with Neighbors for Better Neighborhoods—a local grassroots community organizing agency—residents were engaged to lead the effort and ensure investments aligned with the priorities of those who live in the CiVIC neighborhoods (a name selected by residents, which stands for Community Voices Impacting Community). An Impact Council comprised of residents identified investment priorities, reviewed funding applications, and made investment recommendations to the United Way board of directors.

Paula McCoy, Executive Director of Neighbors for Better Neighborhoods, says “This process fosters community engagement and resident ownership, ensuring buy-in and ultimately making results more sustainable on a long-term basis.”

“We cannot thank the Resident Impact Council enough for their work on this effort,” says Alana James, Director of Community-Based Collaborations for United Way of Forsyth County. “Their dedication and commitment to strengthening their community is truly an inspiration.”

In 2013, the United Way board of directors approved a new place-based strategy. The intent was to focus energy and resources in an area of our community that, while facing challenges, also has a number of strengths upon which to build. The Place Matters pilot program was designed to target thirteen neighborhoods in east and northeast Winston-Salem. The program leverages the assets of the community—residents, social service organizations, faith-based and educational institutions—to create lasting change in our community. The CiVIC neighborhoods were identified based on analysis of data, favorable resident engagement and interest, population size, and existing assets. More than 10,500 people live in these neighborhoods and the immediate surrounding areas where this work will be focused.

The Place Matters funding process was open to any organization and potential partners were asked to submit proposals that aligned with those priorities identified by residents: unemployment and underemployment, mutigenerational support, healthy living, and housing stock and vacant lots. Recipients of the Place Matters grants include a number of traditional United Way agencies, but also new partners with a presence in the CiVIC neighborhoods. In keeping with other strategic shifts implemented by United Way this year, a number of multi-agency collaborative proposals were also funded.

“The collective team is excited to be announcing these grants after a lengthy and incredibly well-considered process,” says Cindy Gordineer, President and CEO of United Way of Forsyth County. “Here at United Way, we are convinced that focusing on neighborhoods with greater challenges will enable us to move the needle community-wide on the critical areas of health, financial stability, and education.”

Part of the Place Matters pilot program also includes a Grassroots Grants initiative for proposals under a $10,000 threshold. This funding application process will be handled in conjunction with Neighbors for Better Neighborhoods’ small grants review and funds will be allocated on a monthly basis.

More specific details on the programs funded as part of the Place Matters investment process is available on United Way’s website at https://www.forsythunitedway.org/our-impact/positive-change-2/. Additional information on Place Matters is available at https://www.forsythunitedway.org/place-matters/.

Working Wonders Together

The Reynolds American 2015 United Way campaign reached nearly $2.6 million in donations, a record performance for a corporate campaign for United Way of Forsyth County. This outstanding performance is attributable to the generosity of Reynolds American employees and retirees, plus the support of The Reynolds American Foundation. This year the Reynolds American Foundation supported the campaign in multiple ways:

·     Matching all employee contributions dollar for dollar

·     Providing an  incentive totaling $50,000 for Business Units to increase their giving by +10% vs. last year in either donors or dollars

·     Aiding the overall Community Campaign effort by providing matching funds for any new corporate or employee campaigns secured this year by United Way of Forsyth County.

The theme for this year’s campaign at Reynolds American was “Working Wonders Together” and certainly the generous performance on this year’s campaign at Reynolds American  will allow United Way to  “work wonders” in continuing to  develop integrated solutions to issues in the community.

Additionally, Reynolds American executives supported United Way by playing a significant part in this year’s United Way Community Campaign. Tommy Payne, President of Niconovum at Reynolds American, served as the Chairman of the Community Campaign and five others served on the Campaign Cabinet.

United Way of Forsyth County wishes to thank all the employees of Reynolds American and The Reynolds American Foundation for their partnership and continued support of our efforts.

UNITED WAY OF FORSYTH COUNTY ANNOUNCES NEW BOARD MEMBERS

PRESS RELEASE
For immediate release

CONTACT:
Tory Gillett
336-721-9319 (office)
Tory Gillett@uwforsyth.org

UNITED WAY OF FORSYTH COUNTY ANNOUNCES NEW BOARD MEMBERS

Winston-Salem, NC ….February 15, 2016
At the December Board of Directors’ meeting, The United Way of Forsyth County Board recognized three retiring directors for their years of service and elected four new directors.

The following directors retired and received commendations for their years of service:

Henry A. Brown, III (Andy) (2005-2015) – During his tenure, Andy served in various leadership roles including Board Chair in 2012 and 2013, Chair of the Marketing and Communications Committee and most recently, Immediate Past Chair and Chair of the Place Based Performance Committee.

Mark R. Johnson (2014 and 2015) – Mark served the past two years as Chair of United Way of Forsyth County’s Young Leaders United, inspiring other young leaders to become involved in United Way.

L. David Mounts (2013-2015) – David was instrumental in Inmar’s company campaign and inspired other companies to become involved in United Way. David’s talent and experience as an innovator was critical during United Way’s strategic planning process and implementation.

New board directors include:

Chris Fox, Vice President, Corporate Social Responsibility, Hanesbrands Inc. Chris’ responsibilities include oversight of Hanesbrand’s worldwide corporate responsibility programs. He received his B.A. in Economics from the College of William and Mary and his Juris Doctorate/MBA from Wake Forest University.

Melissa Martin, Marketing Assistant, Hanesbrands Inc. Melissa is a Wake Forest University graduate, former high school teacher and field hockey coach, and is currently working on her MBA at Wake Forest University. Melissa chairs United Way of Forsyth County’s Young Leaders United.

Stephen J. Motew, MD, MHA, Senior Vice President, Novant Medical Center.
Dr. Motew leads Novant Health’s Greater Winston-Salem market. He is also the senior vice president of physician services for physician clinics and service lines for the Winston Salem market. Dr. Motew has a BA degree in Anthropology from Emory University and received a MD-Cum Laude from the University of Illinois at Chicago, School of Medicine. He is a fellow with the American College of Surgeons, a member of the Southern Association of Vascular Surgery and the Society for Vascular Surgery.

Elwood L. Robinson, Ph.D., Chancellor, of Winston-Salem State University.
Dr. Robinson became Chancellor of Winston-Salem State University in September of 2014. He received his B. A. in Psychology from North Carolina Central University and earned his Doctorate from Pennsylvania State University with clinical training as a research associate at Duke University Medical Center.

SPIRIT OF NORTH CAROLINA AWARD RECIPIENTS ANNOUNCED BY UNITED WAY OF NORTH CAROLINA

PRESS RELEASE
For immediate release

CONTACT: Tory Gillett
336-721-9319 (office)
Tory.Gillett@uwforsyth.org

SPIRIT OF NORTH CAROLINA AWARD RECIPIENTS ANNOUNCED BY UNITED WAY OF NORTH CAROLINA
Winston-Salem, NC ….. February 11, 2016

Each year, the United Way of North Carolina recognizes companies and organizations that have demonstrated strong community support through local United Way involvement. The Spirit of North Carolina Awards celebrate the partnership of people working together to develop and implement innovative solutions for long-term community change.

Businesses, professional and non-profit organizations, governmental entities, healthcare and educational institutions—large and small—are nominated to receive the Spirit of North Carolina Award because they are champions of change. They raise their voice to share the story of their community, volunteer their time and expertise, and invest their resources.

For the third consecutive year, Forsyth County has the highest number of Spirit Award recipients in the state. These include the following organizations and judging categories:

BB&T, Financial/Banking Institutions 1501-2500 Employees
Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP, Business Campaign 51-100 Employees
Winston-Salem Transit Authority, City/County Municipality 101-200 Employees
First Tennessee Bank, Financial/Banking Institutions up to 50 Employees
Wake Forest University, Higher Education 1501-2500 Employees
Reynolds American, Manufacturing 1501-2500 Employees
HanesBrands, Inc., Retail 2501-5000 Employees

In addition, BB&T was honored with the prestigious 2015 Excellence in Community Spirit Award in special recognition of going the extra mile to affect change in our community. This award recognizes excellence in leveraging their caring power by challenging others to join them in their work and producing remarkable outcomes.

“We are extremely honored to be the recipient of both these awards,” said BB&T Chairman and CEO Kelly S. King. “At BB&T, we take our mission to make the communities we serve better places to be very seriously. Supporting the United Way is one way we demonstrate that commitment. This recognition goes to all our BB&T associates who have found helping our fellow man is immensely gratifying and being able to do so is truly a privilege.”

“We are proud to be allied with all of the Spirit Award winners. They demonstrate outstanding commitment to our community by championing change, volunteer their time and talent, and give generously to make a difference,” says Mark Uren, VP/Resource Development of United Way of Forsyth County.

A team of 21 United Way leaders from across North Carolina judged 58 outstanding applications selecting 33 as winners. The established Seven Standards of Excellence—including volunteer culture, partnership with community to raise awareness of needs and foster a spirit of giving, leadership involvement, and campaign coordination—are the criteria on which applications are judged. Awards were presented to the winning companies during the United Way of North Carolina’s Annual Meeting and Awards Luncheon on Wednesday, February 10, 2016 in Pinehurst, North Carolina.

SUCCESS STORY: Financial Pathways

Terry arrives at his counselor’s office wearing a Carolina Beach hoodie. This, he proudly says, is a souvenir from his recent trip to the Wilmington area. The trip was a milestone for Terry: he saved and paid for it himself.

Terry is disabled and has long been unable to handle his own finances. However, his brother had always been there to manage Terry’s disability income and provide a home. Then, Terry’s brother died suddenly and Terry’s life went into disarray. On top of the personal loss, Terry had to find a Representative Payee to manage his money. This is a government safeguard in place for some disabled citizens to insure they do not become homeless and exploited.

Terry signed up with his first payee agency, but continued to struggle. He found a room in an expensive and chaotic boarding house, with no peace or privacy. There was rarely money left after rent and food and without his brother’s supervision Terry made choices that put him in danger. He became estranged from what little family he had.

When his first Payee agency closed, it referred Terry to Financial Pathways. Of his counselor Erica, Terry says, “She’s good! She hangs on to my money for me.” With Erica’s help, Terry began saving a few dollars for the first time. She motivated him to set a goal, and connected him to as many social service agencies as possible. She helped mobilize additional benefits so his limited income could be stretched to the maximum. Next, housing was addressed. Today, Terry lives in city-subsidized apartment, a very small one bedroom, but it is all his. He pays half the rent he was charged at the boarding house.

She is always nice to him, he says, and respectful. “She helped me learn to stop asking to waste my extra money.” Eventually, he saved enough to meet his goal of financing a trip to see his Uncle at Carolina Beach, who he had not seen in years. He beams when he says the visit was “Good, good, good.”

Erica reflects that, “When we get a client stabilized, they often can make better choices.”

Terry says, “I don’t ask for things I don’t need now.” Erica asks him what else is going on with him, and he reports that here has been a mix-up with his food stamp paperwork. “Do you want me to give them a call?” He grins at her as she picks up the phone. Clearly a bond of trust exists.