Press Release: United Way of Forsyth County Announces Open Meetings for Place Matters

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

WINSTON-SALEM, NC – July 9, 2018 United Way of Forsyth County Announces Open Meetings for Place Matters

Open meetings for Place Matters are scheduled for July 10 at 11 AM & July 19 at 2 PM. Both meetings will be held at Goodwill Industries on University Parkway in the Self Reliance Hall.

These meetings are for all interested community agencies, grassroots groups, and partners interested in the funding prospects for the upcoming 2019-2020 funding cycle for Place Matters. It is imperative that interested parties attend as this is where access to the Letter of Intent will be released.

Any questions should be directed to Debbie Wilson, Community Impact Officer at debbie.wilson@uwforsyth.org

 

United Way of Forsyth County brings the community and its resources together to solve problems that no one organization can address alone.

Yesterday’s Progress Should Inspire Today’s Work

There is a lot of troubling news in the world today. Terrorism, inequality and distrust are just a few that come to mind. But when you dig further, you also see encouraging signs.

I recently came across a blog from Ben Carlson on his site, A Wealth of Common Sense. Ben and I share a similar perspective, and his blog highlights many good examples that remind us how far we’ve come.

For example:

  • 200 years ago, 85% of the world population lived in extreme poverty. 20 years ago, it was 29%. Today, only 9% live in extreme poverty.
  • The average American now retires at age 62. One hundred years ago, the average American died at age 51.
  • The U.S. high school graduation rate was just 9% in 1910. It jumped to 52% by 1940 and 83% today.

If these figures blow your mind, I’m not surprised. These examples don’t fit into the narrative broadcast by those who believe the world is spiraling out of control.

Of course, there is a lot of truth to concerns about growing inequality, our readiness for the jobs of the future, and the increasing failures of government – particularly at the national level. As a result, optimism and trust are declining in many parts of the world.

Surveys today typically find that only a small fraction of Americans trust the federal government to do the right thing. Yet more than 70 percent trusted their local government as of a couple years ago.

These numbers make me optimistic, because they present an opportunity for a bottom-up, community-based approach to improve our society.

It’s an approach where people stop shouting past one another and instead listen and attend town council meetings to discuss improving schools and public safety.

It’s an approach where people connect and find common ground that leads to real, scalable impact.

And it’s an approach where our newfound trust and progress creates opportunities for change at higher levels of society, including the national level.

If that sounds a lot like United Way’s model, that’s because it is. We’ve been bringing people together in communities around the world for more than a century. Today’s environment, where trust in local organizations is greater than in national institutions, offers a critical moment to make an impact.

There is still a lot of work to do. The richest one percent of the world controls half its wealth. American millennials today are far less likely than previous generations to out-earn their parents. And our education systems continue to leave too many young people behind.

But it’s graduation season. A time to believe in what we can achieve, both individually and together. So let me end with these reminders:

Let’s continue to believe in the power of communities and the progress we’re making.

Let’s continue to understand the work left to do on behalf of people and communities.

And let’s remain optimistic that people can – and will continue to – come together to change the world.

Press Release: United Way Helped More Than 2 Million Youth Prepare for College, Work & Life

Alexandria, Va. (May 2, 2018) – United Way Worldwide today announced it helped more than 2 million youth (ages 14 – 29) gain the knowledge, skills and credentials to succeed in school, work and life in 2016. That’s based on the 2017 Global Results Snapshot[1], a set of indicators that local United Ways report annually to demonstrate combined impact across communities. United Way invested in or led efforts to serve students in elementary through high school, ensuring that more students showed up for school, earned passing grades, developed soft skills, and received necessary training for success in school and ultimately the workplace to set them up for productive futures.

“The Global Results Snapshot demonstrates our progress against some of society’s toughest problems that prevent young people from gaining the skills and training they need to be relevant, get on a career track and secure successful futures,” said Mary Sellers, U.S. President of United Way Worldwide. “To make our communities strong, safe environments where everyone can thrive, we must continue to work together to ensure our youth emerge in the workforce ready to compete in the fast-changing world of work and primed for success.”

United Way achieved the following results:

  • 115,863 youth received job skills training
  • 98 percent of youth graduated on time
  • 80 percent of youth developed soft skills such as communication and time management
  • 86 percent maintained satisfactory or improved school attendance
  • 66 percent of youth gained post-secondary employment, further education or credentials

United Way also worked with volunteers, partner agencies and corporate partners to:

  • Advocate for 98 policies that promote youth success at the local or state level. In Seattle, WA, United Way helped enact the Homeless Youth Act, to ensure that youth discharged from institutions had a place to live. In Orange County, CA, United Way is leading an effort called Destination Graduation, which has helped more than 26,000 students stay in school
  • Train 7,583 staff in afterschool and summer programming, that provide middle and high school students supplemental resources, including mentoring, tutoring, academic enrichment in the arts and STEM subjects as well as exposure to college opportunities and career possibilities
  • Engage more than 3,500 United Way community partners – like Boys and Girls Clubs, Big Brothers and Big Sisters, the Scouts, 4-H and more – to provide enriching experiences after school and during the summer to help youth succeed

For nearly 130 years, United Way has been the unifying force that brings together community leaders, organized labor, faith-based groups, corporations, nonprofit organizations and governments. United Way is a worldwide network dedicated to building a better life and stronger community for everyone, serving over 61 million people each year.

An infographic of the 2016 Global Results Snapshot on youth success is here. To learn more about United Way’s work to fight for every person in every community, click here.

About United Way’s Global Results Snapshot

The Global Results Snapshot is a common, limited set of indicators that United Ways report on annually to demonstrate our shared impact across communities. The framework aggregates data across United Ways based on indicators in key impact areas: childhood success, youth success, economic mobility, access to health, and community engagement to demonstrate the collective investments the network is making to drive community change deliver results for individuals, families and communities.

[1] *The Global Results Snapshot represents data from 154 United Ways, reporting 2016 data in 2017 that represents 147,474,530 people in their respective metropolitan areas.

About United Way

United Way fights for the health, education and financial stability of every person in every community. Supported by 2.9 million volunteers, 9.8 million donors worldwide and $4.7 billion raised every year, United Way is the world’s largest privately-funded nonprofit. We’re engaged in 1,800 communities across more than 40 countries and territories worldwide to create sustainable solutions to the challenges facing our communities. United Way partners include global, national and local businesses, nonprofits, government, civic and faith-based organizations, along with educators, labor leaders, health providers, senior citizens, students and more. For more information about United Way, please visit UnitedWay.org. Follow us on Twitter: @UnitedWay and #LiveUnited.

Essential Mindset Shifts for Collective Impact

Since the initial publication of “Collective Impact” in Stanford Social Innovation Review (Winter 2011), collective impact has gained tremendous momentum as a disciplined, cross-sector approach to solving social and environmental problems on a large scale. The idea of collective impact is not new—many collaborations pre-date the original article and embody the five conditions of collective impact1—but the original article created a framework and language that have resonated deeply with practitioners who were frustrated with existing approaches to change. Read more here .

Four Ways You can Lift People Out of Poverty

Childhood malnutrition. Illiteracy. Low-wage career paths. These are just a few of the outcomes families face due to chronic unemployment or underemployment. Choosing between putting food on the table, purchasing medication or buying school supplies is a daily financial dilemma for many parents, one that is avoidable with the right support system in place. Read more here .

 

 

Dream Maker: Barbara Duck

“Through the United Way, I discovered a passion I never knew existed.”

Barbara Duck is a mom, mentor, and bank executive. Admittedly, Barbara was really only active in community service through her church prior to moving to Winston-Salem for her role at BB&T. But this relocation is where she found her passion for moving the community needle.

She discovered the United Way Women’s Leadership Council, which allowed her to become more involved in the bank and the community. It is here she learned the power of women connecting with other women, and how those relationships have led to community-changing philanthropy in Forsyth County. “The giving decisions of these women have changed educational outcomes in our community, and individuals are impacted by the collective work of women,” Barbara remarked.

Barbara’s newfound passion in the Women’s Leadership Council inspired her to create. She has committed time and resources to developing the Women’s Information Network at BB&T, also known as W.I.N., which focuses on ways to provide women with resources. With 70% of BB&T’s workforce being female, this gives them access to tools to help manage their careers and find mentors.

Today, we celebrate Barbara Duck as a DREAM MAKER. For leading innovative and systemic change in our Forsyth County!

Project Blueprint

Project Blueprint is a leadership development program designed to increase representation of underrepresented groups on local nonprofit boards and committees. The program consists of a series of training sessions that introduce participants to the roles and responsibilities of a nonprofit board while developing their skills to help them become successful board members.  United Way Worldwide launched Project Blueprint in 1987 as a pilot program funded by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and the first Project Blueprint class from United Way of Forsyth County graduated in 1992.  Since then over 200 individuals have graduated from the program.  Project Blueprint is now a partnership between United Way of Forsyth County and HandsOn Northwest North Carolina.

 

 

Goals.  Project Blueprint seeks to:

  • Recruit volunteers from underrepresented populations for involvement in nonprofit organizations
  • Develop and improve leadership skills
  • Improve service delivery through volunteer involvement in the workplace and community at large
  • Ensure that local volunteer leadership is more reflective of our diverse community
  • Create a network of ethnically and culturally diverse professionals
  • Place program graduates on local nonprofit boards or committees where they can use their knowledge and skills to serve their community

Eligibility.  Project Blueprint seeks applicants who:

  • Are from diverse cultural and ethnic backgrounds
  • Exhibit or have the potential for leadership
  • Show an interest in community involvement and a desire to serve and strengthen our community
  • Will to commit to serve on a nonprofit board of directors or committee upon graduation from the program

What You Can Expect:

  • Acquire knowledge and skills needed to effectively serve on a nonprofit board or board committee
  • Build a peer group of other civic minded persons
  • Help with placement on a nonprofit board

Program.  Recruitment for the next Project Blueprint class begins in November and continues through the application deadline of February 16, 2018.  Class size is limited to ensure a high quality experience and more meaningful networking.  A half day orientation event will be held on March 14.  This event is followed by 9 consecutive classes that will meet each Tuesday, March 13-May 22 from 12-2 pm.  The program closely follows the Ten Basic Responsibilities of Nonprofit Boards, published by BoardSource, a nationally recognized organization dedicated to increasing nonprofit board governance.  Participants are also required to attend a Nonprofit Board Speed Dating event on Tuesday, May 22, to talk with various nonprofits about board and board committee opportunities.  All classes include a networking lunch.

Requirements. Participants are expected to attend all classes, so check your calendar to make sure the dates and times do not conflict with other commitments.  You may miss only one class in order to graduate from the program.  If more than one class is missed, you will be required to repeat the entire program.

Location.  Training sessions will be held at The Winston-Salem Foundation building, located at 751 West Fourth Street, Winston-Salem, 27101, on the 3rd floor in the Neill Board Room.

Cost.  The cost to participate in the program is $75 per person and is due by March 13, 2018.  Many companies sponsor their employees’ tuition, but a limited number of partial scholarships are available.  For information on scholarships, please email KathyDavis@HandsOnNWNC.org.

New Survey Finds Majority of Millennials Stress Over Filing Taxes

new survey, conducted by United Way Worldwide, finds that 74 percent of millennial respondents indicate they felt some level of stress around filing their returns. The survey of over 1,000 millennials (those between the ages of 18-36) reveals that common stressors include making a mistake (48 percent) and not getting a full refund (23 percent).

Additionally, the survey found that millennials are not claiming the tax credits that they have earned. Fifty percent of those surveyed did not claim any tax credits last year; 67 percent of respondents were interested in learning more about tax credits for which they are eligible, including the Earned Income Tax Credit and the Child Tax Credit.

United Way is proud to partner with H&R Block (NYSE:HRB) to provide MyFreeTaxes, a valuable tool that can ease the stress of tax season by helping filers claim the tax credits for which they qualify. MyFreeTaxes is a free, easy and safe tool for anyone earning less than $66,000 to file federal and state taxes.

“United Way’s free tax preparation service, MyFreeTaxes, is the longest standing service provided by a nonprofit,” said Mary Sellers, U.S. President, United Way Worldwide. “Our mission is to help every person in every community achieve financial stability. With so many millennials experiencing stress during tax season, we encourage them – and any qualifying individual – to use our free and easy tax preparation service. The tool will help them claim all the credits they deserve and save on tax filing fees in order to pay down debt, increase savings and reduce the stress they feel around tax season.”

MyFreeTaxes is completely free for households that earned less than $66,000 in 2017. United Way and longtime partner, H&R Block, have provided free tax filing services for federal and state taxes in all 50 states and the District of Columbia since 2009, helping almost one million taxpayers claim every tax deduction and credit for which they are eligible. These tax deductions and credits lead to refunds, totaling $180 million since 2009, that enable individuals and families to improve their financial stability by putting more money back in their pockets. United Way believes that people everywhere should have an opportunity to advance their economic status and is proud to partner with H&R Block to provide a valuable tool to help people better manage their money and get on more solid financial ground.

MyFreeTaxes

Qualifying filers, those earning less than $66,000, can enter data into a secure website, MyFreeTaxes.com, anytime, from anywhere, making it easy to update the documents from home, at work or on mobile devices. The service also includes a helpline, 1-855-MY-TX-HELP, which operates through April 30 from 10:00 am until 10:00 pm EST Monday through Friday and noon to 9:00 pm EST Saturday.  The website also provides a live chat function. MyFreeTaxes is provided by United Way and H&R Block, which offers safe and secure software and guarantees that tax returns are 100 percent accurate.

About United Way Worldwide

United Way fights for the health, education and financial stability of every person in every community. Supported by 2.9 million volunteers, 9.8 million donors worldwide and $4.7 billion raised every year, United Way is the world’s largest privately-funded nonprofit. We’re engaged in 1,800 communities across more than 40 countries and territories worldwide to create sustainable solutions to the challenges facing our communities. United Way partners include global, national and local businesses, nonprofits, government, civic and faith-based organizations, along with educators, labor leaders, health providers, senior citizens, students and more. For more information about United Way, please visit UnitedWay.org. Follow us on Twitter: @UnitedWay and #LiveUnited.

About H&R Block

H&R Block, Inc. (NYSE:HRB) is a global consumer tax services provider. Tax return preparation services are provided by professional tax preparers in approximately 12,000 company-owned and franchise retail tax offices worldwide, and through H&R Block tax software products for the DIY consumer. H&R Block also offers adjacent Tax Plus products and services. In fiscal 2017, H&R Block had annual revenues of over $3 billion with 23 million tax returns prepared worldwide. For more information, visit the H&R Block Newsroom.

MEDIA CONTACT

Southerlyn Reisig, United Way
southerlyn.reisig@uww.unitedway.org
Tel. 703.836.7100 ext.321

Christine Sanchez, United Way
christine.sanchez@uww.unitedway.org
Tel. 703-836-7100 ext. 564

Susan Waldron, H&R Block
susan.waldron@hrblock.com
Tel. 816-854-5522

Community-Wide and Place Matters Program Investments: FY 2017/2018

Click here to download this document as a printable PDF.

Program Name

Lead Agency

Community-Wide (CW) or Place Matters (PM)

Collaborating Partners

Revised Program Funding Level*

Outpatient Therapy Alexander Youth Network

(formerly Youth Opportunities)

CW

 

$85,011.10

Response Recovery American Red Cross

CW

 

$70,371.38

Therapeutic Day Program Amos Cottage

CW

WS/FC Schools

$101,133.04

Emergency Day and Night Shelter Bethesda Center

CW

Insight Human Services

$45,323.04

Big Achievers Big Brothers Big Sisters

CW

YMCA

$33,727.96

Therapy Bowman Gray Child Guidance

CW

 

$137,024.62

Learning for Life Boy Scouts

CW

WS/FC Schools

$80,508.02

Patient Advocate and Minority Outreach Cancer Services

CW

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center Novant Health

Multiple Area Churches

$184,817.27

Young Parent Support Program Catholic Charities

CW

Forsyth Tech

$82,719.71

The Nest Centers for Exceptional Children

CW

  $729,526.61
Integrating Primary Medical Care in a Substance Abuse/Mental Health Setting Community Care Center

CW

Insight Human Services

$44,605.07

Providing Access to Healthcare Services and Medicines for Low Income Uninsured Residents Community Care Center

CW

 

$117,910.21

African American Males Pursuing Educational Dreams Crosby Scholars

CW

 

$42,210.84

Day and Employment Supports Enrichment Center

CW

 

$198,353.97

Parent Aide & Welcome Baby Exchange SCAN

CW

 

$128,929.43

STA Safe Exchange SCAN

CW

 

$25,069.61

Asset Building Connectors Experiment in Self-Reliance

CW

 

$52,898.16

New Century IDA (Individual Development Accounts) Program Experiment in Self-Reliance

CW

 

$56,445.72

Pathways of Caring/Transitional Housing Experiment in Self-Reliance

CW

 

$86,451.08

Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Experiment in Self-Reliance

CW

 

$38,422.70

Ways to Work Family Services

CW

 

$25,052.90

Strong@Home Family Services

CW

Habitat for Humanity

Goodwill Industries

Imprints

Financial Pathways of the Piedmont

$224,182.04

Mental Health Counseling Family Services

CW

 

$239,878.51

Safe Relationships/Child Abuse Family Services

CW

 

$37,416.78

Safe Relationships/Intimate Partner Violence Family Services

CW

 

$233,878.54

School-Based Counseling Family Services

CW

 

$58,917.53

Comprehensive Relapse Prevention Program Fellowship Home

CW

 

$95,041.46

Financial Capability Initiative Financial Pathways of the Piedmont

CW

 

$233,170.78

Prosperity Center Goodwill Industries

CW

Financial Pathways of the Piedmont

$166,714.67

Forsyth Integrated Health Network Insight Human Services

CW

ARCA

Bethesda Center

Community Care Center

Old Vineyard Behavioral Health Services

Oxford House

$210,401.27

Legal Advocacy in Family Violence Legal Aid of North Carolina

CW

Children’s’ Law Center of Central North Carolina

$191,226.47

Truancy Mediation Mediation Services

CW

WS/FC Schools – Social Workers Department

$41,615.48

Health Information & Referral Crisis Intervention Training Mental Health Association

CW

 

$101,143.84

Boys & Girls Club Salvation Army

CW

Insight Human Services

$294,654.94

Food & Shelter Salvation Army

CW

Insight Human Services

$280,338.67

Food Distribution Second Harvest Food Bank

CW

 

$169,759.94

Triad Community Kitchen Second Harvest Food Bank

CW

 

$19,046.60

Group Homes Springwell Network (fka Groups Homes of Forsyth)

CW

 

$94,743.43

Project Graduation Winston-Salem Forsyth County Schools

CW

3 High Schools

3 Middle Schools

3-5 Elementary Schools

$838,291.00

Workforce Development Winston-Salem Urban League

CW

Forsyth Tech

$84,171.55

Education Achievers YMCA

CW

Crosby Scholars

$168,391.89

Literacy Works Program YMCA

CW

Forsyth Tech

Piedmont Triad Workforce Development

Forsyth County Libraries

Goodwill Industries

Knollwood Baptist Church

Bolton, Brunson, Wiley Schools

$101,035.14

Summer Learning Academies YMCA

CW

 

$138,923.31

Best Choice Academic After School & Summer Camp Programs YWCA

CW

Big Brothers Big Sisters

Crosby Scholars

Easton Elementary

Hall-Woodward Elementary

$210,477.21

Gateway to Success Integrated Medical Model Preventing Chronic Disease YWCA

CW

Novant Health

Wake Forest Baptist Health

$95,777.20

Second Chance Graduation YWCA

CW

 

$33,665.10

Supportive Services YWCA

CW

 

$97,628.78

         
         
Student Health and Resource Center Alexander Youth Network

(formerly Youth Opportunities)

PM

 

$57,327.80

Body & Soul Nutritious Eating and Active Living Cancer Services

PM

 

$45,623.46

Stay the Course Catholic Charities

PM

 

$101,289.44

Healthcare Services for Place Matters Neighborhood Residents Community Care Center

PM

 

$98,758.69

Healthy Eating Initiative Crisis Control

PM

Forsyth County Cooperative Extension

Grace Presbyterian Church*

$58,315.95

Pathways of Caring-Outreach for Strengthening Communities Experiment in Self-Reliance

PM

Salvation Army

$126,273.85

New Communion: Mobile Food Pantry First Christian Church

PM

 

$67,320.00

Girl Scout Outreach Program Girl Scouts

PM

 

$35,455.38

JRAMS (Jackets & Rams Achieving Maximum Success) Grace Presbyterian Church

PM

Winston-Salem State University

$29,868.92

Castle Heights Initiative Guiding Institute for Developmental Education (GIDE)

PM

Winston-Salem State University

Winston-Salem Urban League

Family Services

Smart Start of Forsyth County

$29,750.00

Imprint Cares, Community Matters Imprints Cares

PM

Children’s Home Society of NC

Smart Start of Forsyth County

$161,544.46

Insight Skills Development Insight Human Services

PM

Goodwill

Imprints Cares

Salvation Army

$43,300.58

Building Blocks for the Future in Our Neighborhood Liberty East Redevelopment*

PM

Experiment in Self-Reliance

Habitat for Humanity

$126,271.83

The Salvation Army Boys & Girls Club and CiVIC Community Center Salvation Army

PM

Mental Health Association

Insight

$278,450.92

WS/FC Schools Be(e) Legendary Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools

PM

 

$60,000.00

Rams Employment and Community Health Equity (REACHE) Winston-Salem State University: School of Health Science*

PM

Habitat for Humanity

$85,000.00

Neighborhood Empowerment Through Technology (NETT) Winston-Salem Urban League

PM

WinstonNet

Forsyth County Library

Winston-Salem State University

$126,247.85

CiVIC Child Care Solutions Work Family Resource Center

PM

Through Unity Reformation is N-evitable (TURN)

$126,225.00

East Winston STRIDE (Serving Together by Reducing the Impact of Diabetes through Empowerment) YMCA

PM

Novant Health

$84,195.95

East Winston Student Enrichment YMCA

PM

 

$10,000.00

Best Choice Academic After School & Summer Camp Programs

(Place Matters Focus)

YWCA

PM

 

$126,244.11

         
Other Funded Initiatives and Donor Agency Designations
Hospice & Palliative Care Center      

$178,099.65

         
         
Total Community-Wide Program Investments      

$6,097,477.96

Total Place Matters Program Investments      

$1,877,464.19

Total United Way Program Investments: FY2017/18

(including Hospice. Does Not Include  Additional Agency Designations and Other Funding Sources)

$8,153,041.80

The Powerful Questions behind Jeff Bezos’ Philanthropy Tweet

In mid-June, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos shook things up – again.

I’m not talking about Amazon’s purchase of Whole Foods, although in many places that is a big deal.

I’m talking about Bezos’ tweet on June 15th, when he asked for ideas for his emerging philanthropy strategy.  Jeff said he spends most of his time working on ‘the long-term,’ but for philanthropy, he’s interested in the other end of the spectrum: the ‘right now.’

Jeff’s 140-character request gets at the heart of philanthropy.  How best can we create a happier and healthier society?  How do we balance support for urgent need with long-term solutions that attack root causes?

United Way works on both ends of this spectrum.  We support food kitchens, homeless shelters and health clinics.  We also bring community, business and government leaders together to examine long-term problems, like the jobs-skills divide, and find solutions that could take years to bear fruit.  Yet when they do, they create widespread positive change.

In response to Jeff’s tweet, I asked him to consider long-term needs in his philanthropy strategy.  One-hundred forty characters didn’t fully capture what I wanted to say, so I followed up with a letter.

In my letter, I told Jeff that he’s the kind of disrupting force that philanthropy needs.  He didn’t build Amazon into one of the world’s most powerful, game-changing companies without thinking about how technology would affect our lives or how we prefer to consume.  That’s why I think he should embrace a similar way of thinking when it comes to helping people lead better lives.

I asked Jeff, who started Amazon when the internet was in its infancy and now runs a revolutionary aerospace company, to ponder questions like these:

  • What systems can we change to help millions of people, not hundreds?
  • What partners can we cultivate to develop new technologies that allow people to do things like learn more – and learn faster?
  • What barriers can we break that keep us from coming together to solve our most difficult challenges?

In other words, I’m hoping Jeff is willing to disrupt philanthropy for the better.  Of course, he should address the many immediate needs facing our society – and his tweet received some great responses to that effect – but I’m hoping he’ll also apply his talents and experiences in creative, long-term ways.

I’m hopeful that Jeff will reply and ask how we can work together.  But I also want to know what you think.  How should non-profits and philanthropists balance short- and long-term needs?  How can philanthropy be ‘disrupted’ for the better?  How could technology play a part?

By BRIAN GALLAGHER , CEO, United Way Worldwide