Yesterday’s Progress Should Inspire Today’s Work

There is a lot of troubling news in the world today. Terrorism, inequality and distrust are just a few that come to mind. But when you dig further, you also see encouraging signs.

I recently came across a blog from Ben Carlson on his site, A Wealth of Common Sense. Ben and I share a similar perspective, and his blog highlights many good examples that remind us how far we’ve come.

For example:

  • 200 years ago, 85% of the world population lived in extreme poverty. 20 years ago, it was 29%. Today, only 9% live in extreme poverty.
  • The average American now retires at age 62. One hundred years ago, the average American died at age 51.
  • The U.S. high school graduation rate was just 9% in 1910. It jumped to 52% by 1940 and 83% today.

If these figures blow your mind, I’m not surprised. These examples don’t fit into the narrative broadcast by those who believe the world is spiraling out of control.

Of course, there is a lot of truth to concerns about growing inequality, our readiness for the jobs of the future, and the increasing failures of government – particularly at the national level. As a result, optimism and trust are declining in many parts of the world.

Surveys today typically find that only a small fraction of Americans trust the federal government to do the right thing. Yet more than 70 percent trusted their local government as of a couple years ago.

These numbers make me optimistic, because they present an opportunity for a bottom-up, community-based approach to improve our society.

It’s an approach where people stop shouting past one another and instead listen and attend town council meetings to discuss improving schools and public safety.

It’s an approach where people connect and find common ground that leads to real, scalable impact.

And it’s an approach where our newfound trust and progress creates opportunities for change at higher levels of society, including the national level.

If that sounds a lot like United Way’s model, that’s because it is. We’ve been bringing people together in communities around the world for more than a century. Today’s environment, where trust in local organizations is greater than in national institutions, offers a critical moment to make an impact.

There is still a lot of work to do. The richest one percent of the world controls half its wealth. American millennials today are far less likely than previous generations to out-earn their parents. And our education systems continue to leave too many young people behind.

But it’s graduation season. A time to believe in what we can achieve, both individually and together. So let me end with these reminders:

Let’s continue to believe in the power of communities and the progress we’re making.

Let’s continue to understand the work left to do on behalf of people and communities.

And let’s remain optimistic that people can – and will continue to – come together to change the world.

Press Release: United Way Forsyth County Recognizes Campaign Volunteers and Partner Agencies at Award Ceremony

WINSTON-SALEM, NC –  United Way Forsyth County Recognizes Campaign Volunteers and Partner Agencies  at Award Ceremony

On May 3, 2018, The United Way of Forsyth County hosted a thank you and award ceremony honoring partners, staff, volunteers and donors for their work during the 2017 campaign at the Center for Design Innovation.

Winners included:

Laura Harrell, Hall of Fame Award, Twin City Warehouse/Adele Knits- recognized for her thirty years of service as a campaign chair.

Wake Forest University, Personal Touch Award; Barbara Walker, the 2017 Campaign Chair, was also recognized for her hard work and organization of a successful campaign.

Campaign Chair of the Year Award: Dave Riser, Reynolds American Inc.; Riser was recognized for being instrumental in Reynolds American’s campaign which reached a goal of 2.2 million dollars.

Shining Star Award: Goodwill Industries of Northwest NC; Goodwill was recognized as a partner agency and true advocate for the United Way.

Advocates of the Year: Jennie Grant- Heaton, BB&T , Trisha Coleman, Novant Health Forsyth Medical Center; as leaders of our Young Leaders United and Women’s Leadership Council affinity groups.

Leader of the Year: Tony Smits John Deere-Hitachi, recognized for the company’s 65% participation rate and 31% increase campaign dollars raised.

Spirit of the Community Award: Quality Oil-recognizing their leadership as keen advocates and supporters of the United Way.

Special Guest Speakers included Andrea Kurtz, Senior Director, Housing Strategies who updated the attendees on the progress of the ten-year plan to end chronic homelessness. In 2006, the city of Winston-Salem, and Forsyth County adopted the Ten Year Plan to End Chronic Homelessness. United Way of Forsyth County was chosen for its expertise and capacity to leverage community resources, coordinate collaborative projects and improve the system for all people experiencing a housing crisis. Since 2006, Chronic Veteran Homelessness has been eradicated and the number of the chronic homeless has been reduced from over 200 in 2006 to 17 (as documented in the January, 2018 Point in Time Count). Kurtz noted, “We continue to work towards a day when individuals are referred to their talents and contributions and not their housing status.”

Denita Mitchell, Program Director and former Client of the YWCA Hawley House spoke about her own recovery from substance abuse and how she moved from being a client of the Hawley House program to a member of the leadership team.  “I am very thankful to the United Way for supporting a program that helped me make a difference in my life”.

United Way of Forsyth County President and CEO, Cindy Gordineer noted, “One thing every strong community needs is a strong United Way. We are very fortunate to have a large network of partners that work with us collaboratively to ensure our entire community has access to a good life, as well as  our community volunteers who advocate passionately for those most in need. Thank you joining us in celebrating what it means to Live United over the past 95 years”.

 

Pictured: l-r: Dave Riser, VP External Relations, Reynolds American, Cindy Gordineer, President and CEO, United Way Forsyth County,  Dr. John D. McConnell, CEO Emeritus , Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

United Way of Forsyth County brings the community and its resources together to solve problems that no one organization can address alone.

 

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What Every Kid Needs to Do to be Healthier

Now that warmer temperatures are here, it is a great time to get outdoors with kids to enjoy the sunshine and help them get their daily dose of physical activity. With childhood obesity on the rise and kids spending more than seven hours a day in front of screens, it’s more important than ever that children make daily exercise part of their routine.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that kids and teens get at least one hour of physical activity per day. Activities like jumping rope, running, climbing on monkey bars and gymnastics are fun ways that kids can fulfill their daily quota, while also strengthening their bones and muscles.

Craig Williams, director of the Children’s Health and Exercise Research Centre at the University of Exeter in England, tells CNN that exercise should include muscle-strengthening activities at least three days a week.

“One of the most important reasons that children should be active is for their bone health, as it is shown that in the adolescent years, 33% to 43% of total bone mass is acquired,” he says.

A few other ways you can make exercise fun for kids are:

  • Turn a walk around the neighborhood into a game, or incorporate short races from mailbox to mailbox, for example
  • Take them to the playground or a nearby park to run around with their friends
  • Sign them up for a team sport, like soccer or baseball

One cautionary note: Girls tend to let exercise slide once they reach adolescence, according to Dr. Stephanie Walsh, medical director of child wellness at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. She tells CNN that the goal is to encourage teen girls to get their daily exercise without introducing body images. Dr. Walsh’s tip for parents? Don’t ever associate it with weight or weight loss.

“Physical activity has so many other benefits that has nothing to do with weight,” Walsh says. “When you’re talking to kids about that activity, talk to them about the benefits, better sleep, better concentration, feeling better, being stronger, increased muscle mass, all those things that are really important about it, but don’t focus on weight.”

Bottom line: Children and adolescents need 60 minutes of physical activity each day, whether they fit it in all at once or do short bursts of activity throughout the day. The goal is for them to get their heartbeat up, and to instill in them healthy habits that they’ll carry into adulthood.

For more resources on healthy living, check out this blog about reducing stress and this post about how to encourage healthy habits in your children.

Press Release: United Way Helped More Than 2 Million Youth Prepare for College, Work & Life

Alexandria, Va. (May 2, 2018) – United Way Worldwide today announced it helped more than 2 million youth (ages 14 – 29) gain the knowledge, skills and credentials to succeed in school, work and life in 2016. That’s based on the 2017 Global Results Snapshot[1], a set of indicators that local United Ways report annually to demonstrate combined impact across communities. United Way invested in or led efforts to serve students in elementary through high school, ensuring that more students showed up for school, earned passing grades, developed soft skills, and received necessary training for success in school and ultimately the workplace to set them up for productive futures.

“The Global Results Snapshot demonstrates our progress against some of society’s toughest problems that prevent young people from gaining the skills and training they need to be relevant, get on a career track and secure successful futures,” said Mary Sellers, U.S. President of United Way Worldwide. “To make our communities strong, safe environments where everyone can thrive, we must continue to work together to ensure our youth emerge in the workforce ready to compete in the fast-changing world of work and primed for success.”

United Way achieved the following results:

  • 115,863 youth received job skills training
  • 98 percent of youth graduated on time
  • 80 percent of youth developed soft skills such as communication and time management
  • 86 percent maintained satisfactory or improved school attendance
  • 66 percent of youth gained post-secondary employment, further education or credentials

United Way also worked with volunteers, partner agencies and corporate partners to:

  • Advocate for 98 policies that promote youth success at the local or state level. In Seattle, WA, United Way helped enact the Homeless Youth Act, to ensure that youth discharged from institutions had a place to live. In Orange County, CA, United Way is leading an effort called Destination Graduation, which has helped more than 26,000 students stay in school
  • Train 7,583 staff in afterschool and summer programming, that provide middle and high school students supplemental resources, including mentoring, tutoring, academic enrichment in the arts and STEM subjects as well as exposure to college opportunities and career possibilities
  • Engage more than 3,500 United Way community partners – like Boys and Girls Clubs, Big Brothers and Big Sisters, the Scouts, 4-H and more – to provide enriching experiences after school and during the summer to help youth succeed

For nearly 130 years, United Way has been the unifying force that brings together community leaders, organized labor, faith-based groups, corporations, nonprofit organizations and governments. United Way is a worldwide network dedicated to building a better life and stronger community for everyone, serving over 61 million people each year.

An infographic of the 2016 Global Results Snapshot on youth success is here. To learn more about United Way’s work to fight for every person in every community, click here.

About United Way’s Global Results Snapshot

The Global Results Snapshot is a common, limited set of indicators that United Ways report on annually to demonstrate our shared impact across communities. The framework aggregates data across United Ways based on indicators in key impact areas: childhood success, youth success, economic mobility, access to health, and community engagement to demonstrate the collective investments the network is making to drive community change deliver results for individuals, families and communities.

[1] *The Global Results Snapshot represents data from 154 United Ways, reporting 2016 data in 2017 that represents 147,474,530 people in their respective metropolitan areas.

About United Way

United Way fights for the health, education and financial stability of every person in every community. Supported by 2.9 million volunteers, 9.8 million donors worldwide and $4.7 billion raised every year, United Way is the world’s largest privately-funded nonprofit. We’re engaged in 1,800 communities across more than 40 countries and territories worldwide to create sustainable solutions to the challenges facing our communities. United Way partners include global, national and local businesses, nonprofits, government, civic and faith-based organizations, along with educators, labor leaders, health providers, senior citizens, students and more. For more information about United Way, please visit UnitedWay.org. Follow us on Twitter: @UnitedWay and #LiveUnited.

This May is Mental Health Month, Let’s Start Talking So We Can Start Changing.

Mental illness. It has become a taboo talking point in society, up there with politics, age and salary. Across dinner tables and cubicles, among family members and colleagues, there are just some things you don’t discuss … right? Not when it comes to mental illness.

Look around you. Chances are someone close to you is suffering with their mental health. In fact, one in five adults in America experiences mental illness, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. It’s not just strangers, either. It’s your uncle, your boss, your classmate. It’s me.

I was diagnosed with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) in high school, a good 10 years after I first noticed the emerging signs. What started out as repeating things verbally turned into touching objects four times (compulsions) and having obtrusive thoughts (obsessions) that would last weeks, months and even years. I was shackled by anxiety for much of my youth. I was lost.

For the longest time, I thought OCD was a “life sentence” handed down to me by the universe with no possibility for parole. It wasn’t until I got older and sought help that my mindset began to shift. I could choose to let the disorder define me, or I could use it as a catalyst to maximize my life. Before I knew it, OCD had cultivated a sense of default appreciation and a knee-jerk thankfulness that I now cherish.

I’m not alone. If you’re suffering, you’re not alone either. There are 48.3 million people in America who suffer from mental illness—from athletes and celebrities, to teachers and engineers. People in your past and folks in your future. Mental illness is pervasive. And often, people aren’t getting the help they need, either due to embarrassment, a lack of resources or simply not knowing where to turn.

But there is hope. And there is help. From the counseling services supported by United Way, 2-1-1 and MISSION UNITED, to the myriad community, online and government programs, resources to support one’s mental health are available. But that’s not enough. To create sustainable solutions, we need to keep bringing the topic of mental illness out of the conversational shadows.

Imagine what could happen if we change our perception about mental health as a society. If we make it the centerpiece of our conversations instead of brushing it under the dialogue rug. If we begin to accept the escalating reality instead of looking the other way. If we start asking for help—for ourselves and our loved ones—instead of staying quiet. If we speak up.

This Mental Health Month, let’s start talking so we can start changing.

by: Nick Thomas

Press Release: 2018 Keith Vaughan, Peggy Taylor and the late John Taylor and Mitch Neuhauser Receive United Way of Forsyth County’s Highest Honors

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

WINSTON-SALEM, NC — April 17, 2018 Keith Vaughan, Peggy Taylor and the late John Taylor and Mitch Neuhauser Receive United Way of Forsyth County’s Highest Honors

On April 12, 2018, The United Way of Forsyth County recognized key philanthropic leaders in the community at its annual Tocqueville Leadership event.

Keith Vaughan was honored with the Paul Fulton Tocqueville Leadership Society Award.

The Paul Fulton Tocqueville Leadership Society Award was established in 1987 and is presented annually by the Society to an outstanding volunteer who has demonstrated untiring commitment, visionary leadership, resourcefulness and creativity in meeting the needs of our community.

Keith Vaughan is the Chair Emeritus of Womble Bond Dickinson, having served as the firm’s Chairman and Managing Partner from 2002 through 2015. He retired from the firm in January concluding almost 43 years in the practice of law – all at Womble Bond Dickinson.

Mitch Neuhauser, Chair of the Tocqueville Leadership Society, was named Volunteer of the Year. Neuhauser serves as Vice President and Assistant General Counsel at RAI Services Company.

Peggy Taylor and the legacy of her late husband John were honored with induction into the Million Dollar Roundtable

Peggy is an accomplished local artist and John was a Chapel Hill alum, an Army veteran, and a successful businessman.

John and Peggy started their own foundation in 2010. Throughout their life together, they were active members at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, supported UNC athletics and academics, and were instrumental in building and operating the Vision Tennis Center (now Taylor Tennis Center) in Clemmons, one of the first indoor tennis facilities in the area.

Through their support of United Way of Forsyth County, they impacted countless lives in our community. John’s giving spirit lives on today through his family and his legacy of quiet generosity.

The Million Dollar Roundtable is UWFC’s highest level of philanthropic giving and its members have invested a million dollars or more in the work of UWFC over the course of ten years or less. This critically important group of donors allows the work of UWFC to deepen and become more impactful through their generous investments. This award is recognized nationally by the United Way World Wide and locally by United Way of Forsyth County.

To date, United Way of Forsyth County has recognized four individuals or families.

PAST RECIPIENTS

2014 John and Mary Louise Burress

2015 Andy and Margery Brown

2016 Kelly and Eva Ann King

2017 John (late) and Peggy Taylor

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This local angel excels at love and laughter- by John Railey – Winston Salem Journal

This is a column about an angel, Claudette Weston of Winston-Salem, who may choke on her coffee, laugh and say she is no damn angel as she reads that.

But she is an angel. The best kind. The human kind.

That was readily apparent Wednesday night as Claudette shined during the presentation of the United Way award for excellence in nonprofit management named for her and her late husband, Joel Weston Jr. (Goodwill Industries of Northwest North Carolina was this year’s winner.) A rainbow range of nonprofit leaders, workers and volunteers mingled happily at the Old Town Club, many trying to get a moment with Claudette (everybody calls her by her first name) just to love on her and try to catch a little bit of her magic. She happily obliged as many as she could get to, making each of us feel like we were the people at the party with whom she most wanted to talk and laugh.

“She just cares about people,” her son Julian told me last week. “She really doesn’t see colors. She doesn’t see differences.”

Her daughter, Caroline Stopyra, said: “She has always been a strong advocate for the underdog and is unafraid to defend her beliefs. She has friends from every age and walk of life because she is so real, compassionate and fun to be around … She’s passionate, funny, intelligent, and intuitive.”

Claudette spins such good stories you don’t realize until later that she’s giving you subtle lessons about the power of love and service, stories infused with a practical brilliance. For more than half a century, she has helped lead in causes including health, education, the environment, foster children and sports.

As her son Joel Weston III told me, “She is truly one of the most loving and giving people you will ever know, but she is also tough as nails and has an excellent sense of humor. She always thinks of others first.”

Maybe she’s led so many to the light because she knows well the darkness of which she rarely speaks. She comes from modest means in Winston. Her father died when she was 9. Her mother raised Claudette and her siblings with the help of her mother and “Aunt Birdie.” They were all “strong, fair-minded, hardworking women that told it like it was and believed in equality way back in the 1940s and 50s,” Caroline said.

Ernie Shore, the former pro baseball player and longtime Forsyth sheriff, mentored Claudette and helped her get to Guilford College.

Claudette graduated from Guilford, then married Joel Jr., whom she’d known since the fourth grade and had dated since high school. They were well into raising their four children in 1984 when Joel Jr. died of a heart attack while on a canoeing trip in Canada. He was just 47, a beloved businessman.

“I think she (Claudette) — got through a lot of it with Billy Joel and Lionel Ritchie,” Julian said. “She’d get a little misty-eyed when she listened to some of the Billy Joel songs.”

Claudette, of course, pushed on, shepherding her fine children through adulthood. Caroline said her mother “is fiercely loyal and loves her family to the core. All of her eight grandchildren adore her and have inside jokes with her that they mutually think are clever.”

Claudette started an event-planning company with her sister Nancy that is now known as Weston and Associates, beating cancer along the way. And she plunged even deeper into her service work.

In 2012, she told Journal reporter Fran Daniel that she believes in unconditional love, even if that’s not easy, and faith that can move mountains. Nothing makes his mother happier, her son David said, than to be in her longtime church, St. Timothy’s Episcopal, on Sundays.

She told Journal reporter Bill Cole in 2006: “The other part of me is that if locally there’s a child involved that can better himself, I’m right on it. I will do anything to help children grow. If you locked me in a room I’d be crazy. I mean crazy. It’s probably the way God’s going to have me die: Lock her up!”

Hang around with Claudette for just a short time in a public place and you will meet some of her many friends, people coming up to her with stories about how she helped them or their children through rough patches. They talk about her cards as well. She’s sent out thousands of them, if not tens of thousands, some to people who’d never gotten a kind note. Claudette’s happy handwriting picks the recipients up, pats them on the back, gives them a hug and shares a laugh or a tear with them. And then, of course, there are all the homemade, to-die-for rum cakes Claudette delivers to many friends each year soon before Christmas.

“I often joke with her about giving too much back to the community, which she basically ignores, or likes to remind me that you can never give too much back to the community,” David Weston said. She inspires others to get involved, he said.

What do you do with a mother like that, one whom so many others think of as a second mother or mentor or close friend, one who keeps everybody in stitches? I reckon her children know the answer: You just keep on loving her forever and ever, just as so many others do and will. And you spread the love and laughter that Claudette subtly teaches to give to all.

Press Release: Sallye Liner and Kelly King Receive United Way of Forsyth County’s Highest Honors

WINSTON-SALEM, NC —  Sallye Liner, former president of Forsyth Medical Center and Kelly King, BB&T chairman and CEO were recently bestowed with the United Way of Forsyth County’s (UWFC) highest honors at a special recognition event.

King was inducted into UWFC’s Million Dollar Roundtable and Liner was honored with the Paul Fulton Tocqueville Leadership Society award at the Tocqueville and Legacy Society recognition dinner and event held in Winston-Salem’s Millennium Center .

Liner has been a generous donor of time and resources to UWFC and a member of the Tocqueville Society since it’s establishment . She’s been a member of the UWFC board since 2007, a founding member of the UWFC’s Women’s Leadership Council in 2007 and served as campaign chair in 2011, leading the community in raising $17.3M. In addition, Liner was UWFC board chair 2014 – 2015.  She is currently chair of the Place Matters Committee, UWFC’s neighborhood centered initiative and is a member of the United Way Foundation Board.

King, is a major supporter and UWFC donor at the highest level.

The Million Dollar Roundtable is UWFC’s highest level of philanthropic giving and its members have invested a million dollars or more in the work of UWFC over the course of ten years or less. This critically important group of donors allows the work of UWFC to deepen and become more impactful through their generous investments.

There are only 550 members of the Million Dollar Roundtable in the United States.

UWFC has two Million Dollar Rountable members.  John Burress, a trustee at Kate. B. Reynolds Charitable Trust and retired President of JW Burress, Inc., which serves the Mid-Atlantic states as distributors of construction machinery.  King joins Burress and other generous philanthropists across the U.S. that are truly committed to United Way and its mission of bringing communities together to solve problems.

The Paul Fulton Tocqueville Leadership Society is presented annually to an outstanding Forsyth County volunteer who has demonstrated untiring commitment, visionary leadership, resourcefulness and creativity in meeting the needs of the community.

Local Benefactor Paul Fulton was instrumental in establishing the UWFC’s Tocqueville Leadership Society in 1987.  The award was renamed in 1997 to recognize his extraordinary volunteerism.  Fulton is a former chief executive of Sara Lee and Bassett Furniture Industries Inc. and former Dean at the Kenan-Flagler Business School at UNC-Chapel Hill.

Blog: What is Place Matters?

What Is Place Matters?

Simply put, Place Matters is about doing with, and not for – and at United Way we think that makes all the difference.

The opportunity for a good life begins in our families, our schools, and our jobs. And it begins in our neighborhoods. Place, or where we live, matters. And it’s no different here in Winston-Salem & Forsyth County.

Because we believe our entire community is better off when all its neighborhoods are healthy and thriving, United Way launched Place Matters – a new, innovative strategy guided by local residents that invests in programs to help strengthen neighborhoods.

What makes Place Matters different?

  • It is resident-led and inspired. At United Way, we want residents – the people who know their neighborhoods the best – to make decisions on what’s needed. It seems obvious, but it doesn’t always happen.
  • It is asset-based – we are building upon the gifts, skills, and talents of residents to strengthen their neighborhoods.
  • Collaboration. At United Way, we are able to convene community stakeholders – residents, nonprofit organizations, the faith-based community, and business and education leaders –in an inclusive approach focused on sustainable change in the buildings block of a good life: Education, Financial Stability, and Health. By working together, we can all achieve greater results.

Engaging the Community

Through our key partnership with Neighbors for Better Neighborhoods, we are engaging residents to ensure investments align with the priorities of those who live in and experience their neighborhoods every day.

In Place Matters, a group of residents from 13 neighborhoods in northeast Winston-Salem have joined together to make the place they live stronger. This Resident Impact Council identifies guiding priorities for funding, recommends programs to receive funds, and then evaluates whether those programs are working successfully. The Resident Impact Council have even given their 13 neighborhoods a collective name: CiVIC = Community Voices Impacting the Community (see map).

 

The Resident Impact Council identified the following “Guiding Priorities” as issues they would like to see improved in their community through United Way’s Place Matters investments.

Unemployment and Underemployment

  • Job placement
  • Skill development
  • School successMultigenerational Support
  • Seniors
  • Teens and young adults
  • ChildrenHealthy Living
  • Access to fresh and healthy food
  • Increase physical activity levels
  • Preventative healthcareHousing Stock and Vacant Lot
  • Improve existing housing stock
  • Increase utilization and repurpose of vacant lotsInvesting in Change
  • In 2016/17, United Way of Forsyth County is investing about $2.7 Million in programs focused on those Guiding Priorities and strengthening the CiVIC neighborhoods. We know change will not happen overnight. United Way is committed to Place Matters, the CiVIC neighborhoods, and the people who live there for the long-term

Click here to learn more about programs funded through Place Matters !

Press Release: Five local Organizations Named Recipients of Spirit of North Carolina Award

WINSTON-SALEM, NC – Five Forsyth County organizations, who were named recipients of the United Way of North Carolina’s prestigious Spirit of North Carolina Award, will be honored at the state-wide annual award Luncheon, noon, at the Sheraton Hotel & Koury Convention Center, 3121 West Gate City Boulevard in Greensboro, on February 17.

Nominated by United Way of Forsyth County (UWFC), the recipients are Aladdin Travel and Meeting Planners, City of Winston-Salem, B/E Aerospace, Reynolds American and HanesBrands Inc.

Each year, United Way of North Carolina recognizes companies and organizations that have demonstrated strong community support through local United Way involvement.  The Spirit of North Carolina Awards celebrate the partnership of people working together, united to develop and implement innovative solutions for long-term community challenges.

Businesses, professional and non-profit organizations, governmental entities, healthcare and educational institutions—large and small— who are champions for change are nominated for the award. They are community leaders that raise their voice to share the story of their community, volunteer their time and expertise, and invest their resources.

“We are proud to be partners with all of the Spirit Award winners. They demonstrate outstanding commitment for change by volunteering their time and talent, and giving generously to make a difference to our community,” said Cindy Gordineer, UWFC president and CEO.

Winners were determined by a panel of 18 judges from United Way organizations across the state. For more information about the Spirit of North Carolina Award and a complete list of winners, visit unitedwaync.org.