Important Information About Economic Impact Payments

Learn more about the Economic Impact payments: ECON-IMPACT-PAYMENTS_FAQ-2.

In Spanish: ECON-IMPACT-PAYMENTS_FAQ-2-SPAN

United in Grief – United Way of Forsyth County’s Message to the Community

The tragic murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis at the hands of a police officer is yet another reminder of the systematic inequities suffered by African Americans and evidence of the underlying inequities and racism that continue to exist in our community and our country.

It is heartbreaking and infuriating, but it’s also confirmation that continuing to make equity a focus of our work is vital to fulfilling our mission.

Racism and discrimination have no place in our society, and we mourn the murder of George Floyd alongside his family and our community. We join those who call for justice for Mr. Floyd and for reforms that will help prevent tragedies like these from happening again.

We acknowledge and condemn the unjust treatment of countless others, including those whose names we may never know. We acknowledge the ongoing incidents and trauma our black community members experience every day.

We’re proud of the way the citizens of Winston-Salem have peacefully expressed their outrage at the death of George Floyd and that members of the WSPD and Forsyth County Sheriff’s Department have supported and participated in the lawful expression of frustration and anger. Change can only happen if we work together and this week has proven that Winston-Salem has the potential to be a model for transformation.

George Floyd’s death cannot be in vain. It must be used as a rallying cry for systematic change and, in our work, as an indicator that we need to prioritize a continued focus on equity in all aspects and move with more urgency.
At United Way of Forsyth County, a strong part of our core values is equity. We seek to support a community that is diverse, inclusive, and equitable. One where citizens, whatever their gender, race, ethnicity, national origin, age, sexual orientation or identity, education or disability, feels valued and respected.

Catrina Thompson, Chief of Police – United Way of Forsyth County Board Chair
Cindy Gordineer, President and CEO, United Way of Forsyth County

April is Child Abuse Prevention Month: Tips for Parents During COVID-19

What can families do to stay healthy and help prevent child abuse and neglect? Click below for strategies from Prevent Child Abuse America to help ALL families better cope during these uncertain times associated with COVID-19.

Tips for Parents during COVID-19 FINAL

COVID-19 in Forsyth County – A Note from United Way of Forsyth County

COVID-19 in Forsyth County

United Way prioritizes a Healthy Forsyth County for all residents, so we are very concerned about the impact of COVID-19 here in our community, the United States, and across the world.

Precautions we all take now may slow the spread of disease and save lives – and they may help to lessen the strain on our healthcare system. And now that COVID-19 is in Forsyth County, we must all be extra careful in how we gather and interact with each other.

To read our current update please click: United Way of Forsyth County_COVID-19_03.13.20

 

 

The Centers for Disease Control

North Carolina Division of Public Health

Forsyth County Health Department

The Coronavirus – COVID-19 in Forsyth County

COVID-19 – in Forsyth County

United Way prioritizes a Healthy Forsyth County for all residents, so we are very concerned about the impact of COVID-19 in our community, here in the United States, and across the world. Precautions we all take now may slow the spread of disease and save lives – and they may help to lessen the strain on our healthcare system. And now that COVID-19 is in Forsyth County, we must all be extra careful in how we gather and interact with each other.

With the health of residents, donors, volunteers, and staff of top importance, United Way is postponing our upcoming Casino Night, scheduled for March 20. We will provide updated details once a new date has been selected. Future events will be evaluated as this complex situation develops, and we will notify attendees as soon as possible with any updates.      

United Way will keep vigilantly monitoring directives, talking with our community partners, and implementing our own measures to ensure the incredible work we support in the community continues to make a difference in people’s lives. 

 At this time, we also hope you continue to think about the less fortunate, elderly, and those with underlying conditions who are at greater risk. United Way is already working with our community partners to develop a plan to ensure vulnerable residents receive the help they need.

 Especially in today’s challenging times, we thank you for Living United.

 

For Anyone in Need – or for More Information

If you think you may have been exposed to COVID-19 and develop symptoms, you may need to seek medical attention. Call your local health department for further guidance. Before going to a health care provider, clinic, hospital or emergency room, call ahead to tell them about your symptoms and how you think you may have been exposed to the virus.

North Carolina’s Department of Health and Human Services has set up a COVID-19 hotline that is staffed by trained medical professionals. Should you have any questions or concerns about the Coronavirus, please call : 866-462-3821.

We strongly encourage you to visit the websites below and follow their recommendations carefully. Your own healthcare provider and your employer can also be good sources of advice.

The Centers for Disease Control

North Carolina Division of Public Health

Forsyth County Health Department – or your local health department

 

NC 211 – Coronavirus Response

 NC 2-1-1, a statewide United Way-funded hotline that serves as an information and referral service system for people in need, will continue to support callers needing access to health and human services resources such as food, financial assistance, and other basic needs throughout this pandemic. This service is free, confidential, and available in many languages 24/7, 365 days a year. Additional information is also available at www.nc211.org.  

 211 is taking steps to enhance service to their existing callers with additional information on COVID-19. They will also be tracking economic hardship resources to meet the many needs we anticipate will surface as a result of the epidemic.

 NC 211 continues to be an important resource during this difficult time by ensuring citizens have access to the health and human services resources they will need the most in the coming weeks.

 

 

Reducing the Cost of School Supplies

As schools across the U.S.  prepare to open their doors in the month ahead, retailers are preparing for the second largest shopping season: back-to-school. According to a recent study, parents are expected to spend more than $27.8 billion on school supplies, or just over $515 on average per child this year. The top items on parent’s back-to-school lists? Uniforms and clothing, followed by electronics such as computers or calculators (TI-89 anyone?), and lastly, shoes and other supplies.

But for many families, back to school shopping is more than just a headache, it’s a serious financial challenge. Last year in Cass-Clay County, North Dakota, more than 6,000 students in K-12 received a free backpack filled with the necessary school supplies to start the year, thanks to generous local donations from the United Way of Cass-Clay.

So how you can help reduce the cost of school supplies this year?

  1. Swap it! Connect with parents at your child’s school and host a uniform or supply swap. Many kids grow faster than they can wear out their uniforms and sports gear, so it’s a great way for you to snap almost-new items for a steal. Many retailers also offer steep clothing discounts in September, and if your child still has quite a bit of growing to do, it may be worth it to spread their apparel purchases out over the course of the year to account for those new inches.
  2. Discount Days! Consider shopping at a local discount stores or online retailers for basics like pencils, notebooks and folders. These retailers often have a huge selection this time of year and may offer back-to-school sales that will help reduce the overall cost.
  3. Back to Budget Basics! Many middle-school and high-school students are old enough to be a part of the budget process. Give them a budget and encourage them to search for the best prices to stretch the dollars further – it’s a great way to engage them in money management basics while also making sure they start school with all the necessities.

Consider stocking up early this year to save, buy in bulk, or check out your local United Way to find out if they’re hosting a school supply drive to help kids start school with the tools to succeed.

Image credit: https://traineracademy.org/

They left coats on trees and poles around Winston-Salem for people in need. Then they marveled at the kindness of others.

To Lois Koufman, the answer to a question that could have been answered in several ways on different levels was simple.

What possessed you to spend your afternoons buying up coats in Goodwill stores to hang in trees for homeless residents of town?

“Because it was cold outside,” she said.

Read more here

United Way and Nest Provide Energy Assistance With ‘Keep Your Neighbors Warm’

ALEXANDRIA, Va.—United Way Worldwide announced today that it is partnering with Nest, a leading manufacturer of smart home products – including thermostats – for “Keep your Neighbors Warm,” a campaign that supports United Way’s efforts to provide energy assistance through the critical 2-1-1 service in communities nationwide.

“Keep Your Neighbors Warm” is part of Nest’s Power Project, a platform backed by Google’s sustainability initiatives that is aimed at helping low to moderate income customers dealing with high-energy costs. Those who wish to donate should visit Nest.com/powerproject, or text WARMTH to 40403.

Energy assistance ranks as the second highest request nationally made to the 2-1-1 network with 1.7 million calls in 2017 from people across the United States seeking help paying their utility or energy bills.

Donations to the campaign will provide capacity-building support for the 2-1-1 network, including investments in artificial intelligence, texting hotlines, and website enhancements, to serve more people in need of energy assistance.

“We are grateful to Google, Nest and the ‘Keep Your Neighbors Warm’ campaign for raising awareness about – and supporting solutions for – a crisis facing millions of households every year,” said Rachel Krausman, Senior Director of 2-1-1, United Way Worldwide. “The campaign gives people a vehicle to support United Way and 2-1-1, so we can continue the fight for the health – and warmth – of the communities that we serve.”

About 2-1-1
2-1-1 is a free, confidential service that connects individuals to resources and services in their local communities by phone, text and on the web. In 2017, the 2-1-1 network responded to more than 14 million requests for assistance. The service is available to 94 percent of the U.S. population, including Puerto Rico, the District of Columbia and is also available in most of Canada. Individuals in need or who are looking for information for someone else can dial 211 from a cell phone or landline to reach a community specialist or visit 211.org for more contact options.

Remembering Ron Drago

In lieu of flowers, Ron’s family has asked that memorial gifts be made to United Way of Forsyth County. Click here to make a memorial gift.

Ronald Joseph Drago passed away Sunday, May 20, 2018, after several years debilitated by Lewy body dementia. He was born on October 10, 1945 in Easton, PA, to Mae Bubba Holden. He was preceded in death by his mother, and his brother Robert Holden. He is survived by the loves of this life: his wife of 46 years, Lucinda Mahoney Drago; his son, Michael Drago (Paulette), Knightdale, NC; his daughter, Sarah Talman (Stefan), New York City; grandchildren: new born twins Grace and Ethan Drago, Gabby Phanor, and Jelena Cherubin; and his sister, Cynthia Holden Wimer. Emmaus, PA.

He graduated from Easton High School, and East Stroudsburg University, where he was also a member of Sigma Pi Fraternity. He served as a Peace Corps Volunteer (1967-69), in Sierra Leone, West Africa. His international experience continued with the US Agency for International Development in Danang and Saigon, Vietnam (1971-75). Following the end of the Vietnam War, Ron led the staff of International Rescue Committee at Fort Indiantown Gap, PA, Seattle, WA, and Bangkok, Thailand, to assist in the resettlement of Vietnamese, Laotian, Hmong, and Cambodian refugees.

His 30-year career with United Way began in Harrisburg, PA, and included serving as the President of United Way of Northampton and Warren Counties (Easton and Bethlehem, PA), and of United Way of Wake County (Raleigh, NC). He retired after 16 years as the President of United Way of Forsyth County in 2011. He was passionate about the mission of the United Way to develop community-based collaborations to meet the needs of individuals in the areas of basic needs, education, financial stability, and health. His special forte was fundraising and strategic planning. He was inspired by the commitment of volunteer business and community leaders dedicated to creating positive changes in human services. Ron enjoyed filling his yard with pots of flowers, cheering for Wake Forest basketball and football teams as well as his lifelong loved New York Giants, meeting the early morning with a daily run, and adding to his Santa collection. He was always impeccably attired from his blue button-down lightly starched shirt in his African village to his coordinated running shorts with tucked in shirt.

A Memorial Mass will be held at St .Leo the Great Catholic Church, Winston-Salem, NC, on Tuesday, June 5, 2018, at 11:00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the United Way of Forsyth County, 301 North Main Street, Suite 1700, Winston-Salem, NC 27101. Online condolences may be made at www.hayworth-miller.com.

Tocqueville Society Dinner Announced

We are excited to announce our annual Tocqueville Society invitation only dinner is just around the corner on Thursday, April 12, 2018.

We will celebrate philanthropic leaders across our community and showcase the spirit of neighbors helping neighbors!

Origins of the Tocqueville Society

Only 26 years old when he came to the United States and Canada in 1831, Alexis Charles-Henri de Tocqueville traveled extensively, recording his observations of life in the young nations.

Though he only spent nine months in North America, he gleaned many profound insights about American society. His observations, readings and discussions with eminent Americans formed the basis of Democracy in America, a detailed study of American society and politics published in two volumes, in 1835 and 1840.

Tocqueville recognized, applauded and immortalized North American voluntary action on behalf of the common good. He wrote: “I must say that I have seen Americans make a great deal of real sacrifices to the public welfare; and have noticed a hundred instances in which they hardly ever failed to lend a faithful support to one another,” eloquently capturing the essence of personal philanthropy that persists almost three centuries later.

The observations on philanthropy made by Alexis de Tocqueville in 1831 are true today; North Americans understand that advancing the common good means creating opportunities for a better life for all. The name Tocqueville Society was chosen because of Alexis de Tocqueville’s admiration for the spirit of voluntary association and effort toward its advancement.

Membership Benefits

Specific local Tocqueville Society benefits differ by location; however, all Tocqueville Society members benefit from:

  • Joining a national network of philanthropic leaders who are engaged locally to create long-lasting, positive changes
  • Partnering with a quality organization and dedicated staff; ensuring that gifts, voice, and time are efficiently invested in local communities to maximize impact
  • The unique position of United Way as one of the world’s premier philanthropic organizations which can be used to convene community business and civic leaders focused on the building blocks of a good life: a quality education that leads to a stable job; income that can support a family through retirement; and good health.
  • Local Tocqueville Society leaders along with National Society and Million Dollar Roundtable members are invited to attend national and worldwide gatherings of Tocqueville and Million Dollar Roundtable Members.

Contact Cathy Coles at Cathy.Coles@uwforsyth.org or call 336.721.9370 to learn how you can become involved in the United Way Tocqueville Society and/or to inquire about membership benefits.