Press Release: Celebrating Improved Student Growth and Achievement- In 2018-19, 27 Schools Exceeded Expected Growth

Destiny Gore is a fifth-grader at Cook Literacy Model School. At a press conference celebrating improved student achievement and growth throughout the school district, Destiny talked about her own growth as a student and as a person.

Destiny also had the chance to meet the new superintendent Dr. Angela Pringle Hairston and several members of the Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Board of Education.

School system administrators, school volunteers, and community partners were also present.

The state has released the released the 2018-19 School Performance Grades (SPG), and, with Cook making notable improvements in student achievement, the press conference was held there.

Principal Paula Wilkins talked to everyone about the work that has gone into making those improvements in the past three years.

 

*The district recognizes and appreciates the efforts of community partners to help improve the graduation rate. The United Way of Forsyth County, the Winston-Salem Chamber of Commerce, Big Brothers/Big Sisters, and The Forsyth Promise each continue to support programs to help students graduate.

Read more here

Reducing the Cost of School Supplies

As schools across the U.S.  prepare to open their doors in the month ahead, retailers are preparing for the second largest shopping season: back-to-school. According to a recent study, parents are expected to spend more than $27.8 billion on school supplies, or just over $515 on average per child this year. The top items on parent’s back-to-school lists? Uniforms and clothing, followed by electronics such as computers or calculators (TI-89 anyone?), and lastly, shoes and other supplies.

But for many families, back to school shopping is more than just a headache, it’s a serious financial challenge. Last year in Cass-Clay County, North Dakota, more than 6,000 students in K-12 received a free backpack filled with the necessary school supplies to start the year, thanks to generous local donations from the United Way of Cass-Clay.

So how you can help reduce the cost of school supplies this year?

  1. Swap it! Connect with parents at your child’s school and host a uniform or supply swap. Many kids grow faster than they can wear out their uniforms and sports gear, so it’s a great way for you to snap almost-new items for a steal. Many retailers also offer steep clothing discounts in September, and if your child still has quite a bit of growing to do, it may be worth it to spread their apparel purchases out over the course of the year to account for those new inches.
  2. Discount Days! Consider shopping at a local discount stores or online retailers for basics like pencils, notebooks and folders. These retailers often have a huge selection this time of year and may offer back-to-school sales that will help reduce the overall cost.
  3. Back to Budget Basics! Many middle-school and high-school students are old enough to be a part of the budget process. Give them a budget and encourage them to search for the best prices to stretch the dollars further – it’s a great way to engage them in money management basics while also making sure they start school with all the necessities.

Consider stocking up early this year to save, buy in bulk, or check out your local United Way to find out if they’re hosting a school supply drive to help kids start school with the tools to succeed.

We Can’t Let Migrant Children Fall Behind- Blog by United Way Worldwide President and CEO Brian Gallagher

When I visited the U.S.-Mexico border earlier this year, I met parents and children fleeing violence in their home countries. These children were receiving basic care. But they weren’t in school. Most didn’t have books or computers to help them learn.

Amid the migrant crisis at the border, we can’t overlook the fact that kids aren’t gaining the skills they need. Basic requirements, such as personal security, must come first, but statistics tell us how important early childhood education is for children. Read more here

Press Release: Giving USA 2019 Report Released; Americans Gave $427.71 Billion to Charity in 2018 Amid Complex Year for Charitable Giving

 

WINSTON-SALEM, NC —Giving USA 2019 Report Shows Americans gave $427.71 billion to Charity in 2018 Amid Complex Year for Charitable Giving

The Giving USA report, released Tuesday, said individual giving fell by 1.1%, from $295 billion in 2017 to $292 billion last year. It ended a four-year streak of increases, and was the largest decline since a 6.1% drop in 2009.

Total charitable giving rose 0.7% measured in current dollars over the revised total of $424.74 billion contributed in 2017. Adjusted for inflation, total giving declined 1.7%…”

From the report:  “…A number of competing factors in the economic and public policy environments may have affected donors’ decisions in 2018, shifting some previous giving patterns. Many economic variables that shape giving, such as personal income, had relatively strong growth, while the stock market decline in late 2018 may have had a dampening effect. The policy environment also likely influenced some donors’ behavior. One important shift in the 2018 giving landscape is the drop in the number of individuals and households who itemize various types of deductions on their tax returns.

This shift came in response to the federal tax policy change that doubled the standard deduction. More than 45 million households itemized deductions in 2016. Numerous studies suggest that number may have dropped to approximately 16 to 20 million households in 2018, reducing an incentive for charitable giving…”

United Way Forsyth County President and CEO, Cindy Gordineer notes, “ The 2019 Giving USA report supports trends that many in philanthropy are seeing.  Charitable giving is changing, becoming more complex and each dollar is more difficult to raise.  Donors are more discerning than ever about seeking results in the non-profit sector and their giving is following positive outcomes.  This philanthropic environment requires non-profits, including United Way of Forsyth County, to evaluate every dollar for both effectiveness and efficiency to deliver maximum value.  Donors deserve nothing less.”

For more information about the United Way, visit www.forsythunitedway.org

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United Way of Forsyth County brings the community and its resources together to solve problems that no one organization can address alone.

 

 

 

Read the full report here

Press Release: Leadership Winston Salem Class of 2019 Graduates Are Honored 

For Immediate Release:  Leadership Winston Salem Class of 2019 Graduates Are Honored

On June 6, the 2019 Class of Leadership Winston Salem celebrated the completion of their program with a graduation ceremony at the Millennium Center.

United Way of Forsyth County’s Senior Director of Engagement , Amanda Rosemann, is a graduate of this year’s class.

Leadership Winston-Salem’s Flagship Program is designed to ignite community leaders with a mission of educating, connecting and energizing leaders to serve and improve the community. Likened to a “community MBA,” participants benefit through active engagement, attending one Program Day each month and working in Action Learning teams to address an actual dilemma faced by a local agency.

The program challenges participants to increase their personal and collective capacity to transform the community through civic engagement, servant leadership and building social capital. Components include:

  • Informative sessions with community leaders
  • Experiential group activities
  • Relationship building/networking opportunities
  • Opportunities for honoring all aspects of diversity
  • Action Learning Projects addressing community needs
  • Emphasis on servant leadership

United Way President and CEO Cindy Gordineer notes, ” As a graduate of LWS’s Insight Program, I know first hand how invaluable LWS is to our community’s growth. The ability to connect leaders with other community leaders and foster collaboration for community improvement, is essential to Winston Salem’s continued growth and development.”

Prior graduates include, United Way of Forsyth County associates, Noelle Stevenson,Campaign Operations Coordinator, Class of 2018 and Charmaine Angino,  Senior Director, Community Planning & Investment, Class of 2017.

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United Way of Forsyth County brings the community and its resources together to solve problems that no one organization can address alone.

Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools has named its Teacher of the Year, Principal of the Year, Classified Employee of the Year and Assistant Principal of the Year.

MAY 24, 2019 – Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools has named its Teacher of the Year, Principal of the Year, Classified Employee of the Year and Assistant Principal of the Year. The winners were announced at a banquet May 23.

Called the “Core Awards”, the annual event highlights and celebrates employees that are exceptional educators and live the district’s Core Values.  The Core Values include equity, student-centered, accountability, integrity, high expectations, and collaboration. There were more than 150 nominees in all. Twelve finalists, 3 in each category, were showcased at the banquet.

Teacher of the Year:  Abi Woodson, 4th Grade Teacher at Speas Elementary is the new Teacher of the Year. Abi has been teaching for 15 years and has been at Speas since 2012. Carrie French of Moore Elementary and Nicole Wooten of Caleb’s Creek Elementary were also finalists.

Classified Employee of the Year:  Sandra Shropshire, Financial/Lead Secretary at East Forsyth High School was awarded Classified Employee of the Year.  Sandra has been at East Forsyth for 15 years. The other finalists were Margo Cochran of Northwest Middle and Angie Grace of Jefferson Elementary.

Assistant Principal of the Year:  Samantha Fitzgerald of Lewisville Elementary is the new Assistant Principal of the Year.  Samantha has been at Lewisville since 2016. She joined Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools in 2013 as a teacher. Tamatha Fullerwinder of Moore Elementary and Kendra Scott of Ashley Academy were also finalists.

Principal of the Year:  Debra Gladstone was named Principal of the Year.  Debra is Principal at Mineral Springs Elementary and Middle Schools.  She has been with Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools since 2000. Angie Choplin of Lewisville Elementary and Donald Wyatt of Sedge Garden Elementary were the other two finalists.

 

Reading Aloud to Middle School Students

Hearing books read aloud benefits older students, enhancing language arts instruction and building a community of readers. Learn more here

The Powerful Effects of Drawing on Learning

The science is clear: Drawing beats out reading and writing to help students remember concepts. It’s long been known that drawing something helps a person remember it. A new study shows that drawing is superior to activities such as reading or writing because it forces the person to process information in multiple ways: visually, kinesthetically, and semantically. Across a series of experiments, researchers found drawing information to be a powerful way to boost memory, increasing recall by nearly double. Read more here.